The Health Inspector's Visit

By Frank Meek International Technical & Training Director, Orkin, LLC | May 19, 2010

While "walking" guests to another establishment may be a common practice during a busy season, hoteliers should ensure that they're walking guests due to overbooking - not because a regulator or inspector has forced a room closure as the result of a pest infestation.

Though pest control is by no means the only area that regulatory inspectors will review, it is an important one. Inspectors will review pest control for the same reasons that hoteliers employ proactive pest management programs - pests can threaten public health, signify greater problems like poor sanitation and cause structural damage. Not to mention that a serious pest problem can lead to claims, additional expense or even a lawsuit from angry customers or negative media coverage.

It should come as no surprise, then, that in a recent poll Orkin conducted among hotel professionals, the respondents ranked pest control as their third most important housekeeping concern behind linen and bathroom cleanliness.

So where does pest control fit into an inspection? Inspectors will be reviewing the entire establishment to make sure pests aren't a problem, but will pay particular attention to foodservice areas.

Foodservice Inspection

Inspectors are concerned with all foodservice operations because they play such a vital role in the health and safety of guests. Richard Raymond, the undersecretary of the USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service, estimates that nearly 14 people die from foodborne illness every day in the United States. Hoteliers do not want the food served at their restaurants to be the cause.

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