Health Inspection: Set yourself up for success best practices for pest management

By Frank Meek International Technical & Training Director, Orkin, LLC | July 15, 2012

You work hard to keep your hotel clean and inviting for guests. Pests in a hotel setting can cause bad word-of-mouth and unhappy guests who may not return to your establishment. But beyond the bedroom walls, one critical area of your hotel when it comes to pest management is your restaurant.

A failed health inspection due to a pest sighting in a restaurant or kitchen can be devastating, resulting in bad word-of-mouth or a potential shut down. Let’s take a look at which pests are most attracted to your facility, pest hotspots that are cause for concern and how to deter pest entry – all information that will help you to prepare for your next health inspection.

A successful Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program seeks to limit chemical usage by reducing conditions that attract pests. IPM techniques like facility maintenance and proactive sanitation practices can go a long way in restricting pests’ access to sources of food, water and shelter. An IPM program also relies on a strong partnership among you, your pest management professional and your employees. To avoid the often costly repercussions of a poor health inspection score, work with your staff and a pest management professional to be prepared for your next health inspection.

Why Pests Are Attracted to Restaurants

Delicious food, smells, warm temperatures – all the same things that we enjoy from a restaurant are also enjoyed by pests. The odor from the presence of food, water and optimal temperatures are what attracts pests to begin with, but it’s certainly hard to reduce these conditions in the midst of a busy mealtime at your restaurant.

Four of the most likely pest guests looking to book a stay in hotel restaurants are flies, cockroaches, rodents and stored-product pests.

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