Library Archives

 
Frank Meek

If you haven't already heard about the return of bed bugs, it's probably only a matter of time before you do. These biting bugs were driven away back in the 1960s, but since the late 1990s, bed bugs have been making a comeback, with much of the activity being found in hotels and other overnight-stay facilities. What is leading to this resurgence? One of the most likely reasons for the uptick in activity is an increase in international travel. According to the Travel Industry Association of America, about 27.8 million foreign visitors came to the United States in fiscal year 2003. By "hitchhiking" on the luggage of unsuspecting travelers, bed bugs can be transported from one place to another quite easily. Read on...

Peter Goldmann

Despite the growing attraction and convenience of purchasing goods and services by credit card, businesses of all kinds - including hospitality companies - are sitting ducks for credit card fraudsters. The problem is two-fold: While until recently, most credit card fraud involved "guests" using stolen or fraudulently obtained credit cards to pay for hotel charges, now the Internet has added a new dimension of credit card fraud threatening hospitality businesses. For example, cyber criminals can hack into a company's customer database and steal large batches of guest credit card information that they then sell on the black market. Or, they can use the stolen credit card information to manufacture counterfeit credit cards, which they then use to fraudulently purchase goods or services. Making matters worse, like companies in other industries that have been hacked by information thieves, hospitality companies could suddenly find themselves on the receiving end of lawsuits claiming damages for liability related to the theft of confidential guest information. To prevent incidents such as these, optimizing the company's information security defenses is the obvious first step. Read on...

Frank Meek

It seems cockroaches, one of Earth's oldest active species, are learning new tricks when it comes to survival. These hardy pests, which have survived 350 million years on the planet, lately are demonstrating more of the cunning that has made them so resilient. Since the 1990s, cockroaches have exhibited an increasing tendency to avoid pesticide baits commonly used in pest control. If your hotels are seeing an upswing in the reports of roach activity, this could be a reason why. Read on...

Peter Goldmann

Kickbacks are an all-too-common restaurant and hotel crime involving insiders and outside vendors. Hospitality companies that acknowledge their vulnerability to these schemes are one big step in the direction of preventing and deterring significant losses. Kickbacks in hotels and restaurants can take many forms, but regardless of their unique and often ingenious qualities, nearly all kickback crimes boil down to improper payments being made to a company employee by an outside vendor. Read on...

Frank Meek

Colder weather is upon us, and your guests will want to spend the night tucked warmly in bed - but they won't be the only ones trying to escape the cold - rats and mice will also be looking for a warm place to spend the night, and if you're not prepared, you might find your establishment playing host to some very unwanted guests. Read on...

Peter Goldmann

The Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE) reports that the average US company loses 6% of gross revenue to internal fraud every year. When you add frauds committed by outsiders-dishonest hotel guests, vendors, restaurant patrons, etc- the loss figures become even more startling. For hospitality security personnel, auditors and controllers, the biggest anti-fraud challenge is the seemingly limitless variety of ways that employees and outsiders find to steal from the organization. Read on...

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Coming up in March 2020...

Human Resources: Confronting a Labor Shortage

With the unemployment rate at its lowest level in decades (3.7%), what has always been a perennial problem for human resource professionals - labor shortage - is now reaching acute levels of concern. It is getting harder to find and recruit qualified applicants. Even finding candidates with the skills to succeed in entry-level positions has become an issue. In addition, employee turnover rates remain extremely high in the hotel industry. As a result of these problems, hotel HR managers are having to rethink their recruitment strategies in order to hire the right talent for the right job. First, hotels have been forced to raise their wages and offer other appealing perks, as a way to attract qualified candidates. Secondly, HR managers are reassessing their interviewing techniques, focusing less on the answers they receive to questions and more on observable behavior. Part of this process includes role-playing during the interview, so that the recruiter can gauge how a candidate works through specific problems and interacts with other team members. Additionally, some HR managers are also creating internal talent pools as a way to address labor shortages. Instead of utilizing department resources to find new hires with specific skills for needed positions, hotels are cultivating talent pools internally and preparing their employees to assume leadership roles whenever the time comes. They are also placing greater emphasis on a company culture that is more performance-based, as a way to curb employee turnover, increase employee satisfaction, and assure higher levels of customer service. Finally, recognizing the importance of employee retention as a way to lessen the impact of a tight labor market, some HR managers are instituting generous reward programs in order to retain their top performers. The March Hotel Business Review will explore what some HR professionals are doing to address these and other issues in their departments.