Library Archives

 
Fred B. Roedel, III

The process of identifying, qualifying and acting on a new hotel location does not have to be a daunting or overwhelming task. In fact it can be a fun and exciting process as long as you establish your objectives and fully investigate the opportunities presented to you. Roedel Companies, through its construction management subsidiary, ROK Builders, is in the business of designing, building and renovating nationally branded hotels along the east coast of the United States, both for itself and independent investors. Over the past four years, ROK has completed over 40 major renovation projects along the east coast for independent investors. Learn about the five most crucial points to address when selecting a location for your hotel in this article. READ MORE

Fred B. Roedel, III

Customers, brands and markets are constantly evolving and changing and how you evaluate and react to these dynamics within the parameters of your own investment discipline can position you for some tremendous upside as our industry's performance improves. READ MORE

Sara Fedele

What will be changing the hospitality business? How can we create effective business strategies? We all agree that running a business today is more complicated and requires more resources (financial, human, technological, etc.) than in the past. Have we ever asked ourselves why and what exactly it is that has really changed? The feedback that we receive from senior managers of international hotel corporations during think tanks and interactive workshops is always the same: "Everything is changing!"But what are the elements representing this "change"? READ MORE

Julia Watson

In a changed hospitality industry, post economic collapse, a new low-price standard has been set for construction services. How did construction pricing get to this point and what are the risks associated with hiring inexpensive labor to complete projects? We are a national general contractor specializing in hospitality construction services and are among a limited few who remain strong in the industry. Read on to learn about the conditions leading up to this point, where the industry is headed, and what to be mindful of for your next project. READ MORE

Sara Fedele

Running a hospitality business today is much more complicated and requires more resources than in the past. When talking about this topic, the feedback from senior managers of international hotel chains is always the same: "Everything changed... The clients changed, as did their satisfaction threshold." Due to the Internet, social media and the low cost phenomenon, the customer of today is more informed, travels more, and as a consequence, he is much more demanding. He looks for excellence, for sophistication, for unique emotions and experiences, but... he doesn't lose sight of his wallet. READ MORE

Donald R. Boyken

Over the last thirty-five years I have studied demographic and industry patterns. As a CEO, I understood that one of my key responsibilities was to look into the future, anticipate the markets and place my company clearly in the position to capitalize on the market trends. Demographic patterns have clearly been one of those tools I used to anticipate movement in the marketplace. The Hospitality industry has a repeatable pattern of recovery from economic downturns. Those CEOs who provide services to the Hospitality industry will do well to pay attention to these patterns and position their company's production capacity and marketing focus to provide products and services to the industry. READ MORE

Fred B. Roedel, III

Renovation projects are successful only when a host of elements come together. The processes and systems that companies develop over time to improve their overall operating performance are often times referred to as Best Practices. Whether you think the term 'Best Practices' is a fad or not, successful companies are often that because they do certain things very well. We have been in the business of owning, operating and renovating hotels for over 40 years and the following is our list of best practices when it comes to successfully renovating hotel properties in an operating property. READ MORE

Fred B. Roedel, III

Maintaining your hotel in top form is critical to realizing its optimum free cash flow ability and its long-term value. Implementing a well thought out annual inspection program will allow you to promptly identify and address maintenance issues. This article will show you how your hotel's value can benefit from four key maintenance areas and provide insight into the most proven approach to maintaining hotels in top condition. READ MORE

Fred B. Roedel, III

Correctly integrating new construction techniques and processes into the development of a new hotel can improve the time, cost and or quality of property. In order to realize the value of new construction techniques and processes, it is critical to take the time to fully understand them, their potential value to the overall project and the time and effort their implementation requires. Learn about how your next new hotel development can benefit from new construction techniques and processes by reading this article. READ MORE

Larry K. Kimball

This past tumultuous two year period has seen large and small banks come and go, regulations rise, consumer demand fall, hotels close, and the general public's acceptance of uncertainty about the future. While we are all reluctantly drinking the "new normal" kool-aid manufactured by Wall Street and politicians, commercial real estate developers need to consider the implications on financing. Financing from private sources is growing as new regulations affect institutional lenders so the landscape is changing. This article is a roadmap for successfully navigating the 2011 financing maze. READ MORE

Jim Holthouser

As hotel development in North America slowly regains impetus, Jim Holthouser, global head of Embassy Suites and full service brands, Hilton Worldwide, and William Fortier, senior vice president, development, Americas, Hilton Worldwide, examine how the Embassy Suites Design Option III prototype and the Kit of Parts approach have sustained brand viability through the economic downturn and continue to support developers as the industry rebuilds. While site selection is a key component to success in the hotel industry, in-depth understanding of the marketplace and a flexible approach to design are equally vital. READ MORE

Larry K. Kimball

Municipalities throughout the U.S. are on the proverbial financial ropes and that is not good news for prospective hotel developers. Taxpayers are realizing public long term debt obligations will be harder to meet and this will create new pressure on politicians. We will discuss how we got here, where it is headed, and best practice strategies hoteliers can use to obtain financial incentives in future public-private partnerships. READ MORE

Larry K. Kimball

If you are not developing a project in California and think this article is irrelevant, keep reading because the California Environmental Quality Act("CEQA") is the model for future regulations in your jurisdiction. We will highlight how CEQA shapes development projects but more importantly how politicians, organized labor, and environmentalists often leverage the CEQA approval process to further their self-interests at the expense of developers and communities. READ MORE

Larry K. Kimball

Developers fortunate enough to have an opportunity to develop hotels in or near heritage areas have a duty to incorporate history into their project. Cultural heritage activities are one of tourism's biggest market opportunities but how to capture it? This article outlines five models to profitably attract and retain those visitors and their discretionary dollars. READ MORE

Donald R. Boyken

The Baby Boomer's new "theme park" are now the casino and the spa. In the 1990's, the baby boomer generation - those born between the years 1946 and 1962 -- spent a great deal of their time and money visiting theme parks with their families. Now that their kids have grown, these same thrill-seekers have shifted their focus toward entertaining themselves. One venue that has been a major beneficiary of this trend is the spa. According to the International Spa Association, based in Lexington, Kentucky, some 57 million American adults have been to a spa. There are an estimated 12,000 spas in the United States, and that's up from 5,700 just a few years earlier. Today, spas occupy an estimated 86.7 million square feet of indoor space in the U.S. Spas are this country's fourth largest leisure industry. Collectively, they generate more than $11 billion in revenue each year. READ MORE

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Coming up in May 2020...

Eco-Friendly Practices: Creative Innovation

Being eco-friendly is no longer a fad. It is an urgent planetary need and hotels are actively doing their part to reduce their carbon footprint by implementing sustainable, green practices. In addition to the goodwill derived from doing the right thing, hotels are also realizing the benefits to their business. A large percentage of Millennials expect hotels to be eco-friendly and will only patronize those properties that are proudly conforming. Consequently, more hotels are realizing that sustainability is a key element in a successful branding strategy. In addition, going green can lead to a more profitable bottom line, as savings on electricity, water and cleaning materials can add up. Also, there are other advantages that come with being an eco-friendly business, such as government subsidies and tax and loan incentives. As a result, many hotels are finding innovative ways to integrate eco-friendly practices into their business. Geo-thermal energy systems, along with energy-from-waste systems, are being used to heat and cool the property. Passive solar panels, green roofs, natural lighting and natural ventilation strategies also assist in energy conservation. Low-flow water systems and plumbing fixtures make a contribution, as does eco-friendly hardwood flooring, and energy efficient televisions and appliances throughout the property. In addition, some hotels have implemented in-room recycling programs, and only provide all-natural, personal care items. One hotel has actually constructed a bee-keeping operation on their grounds. Not only is this good for the bees but the hotel also produces products from the operation which they sell. This kind of creative innovation also holds enormous appeal to guests. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some hotels are doing to integrate sustainable practices into their operations and how they are benefiting from them.