The Overlooked Key Elements of Employee Integration

The introduction of a new employee to your hotel is more multidimensional than we previously thought

By Lisa Seay Founder, Element C | March 11, 2018

Welcoming new employees is likely something you do often. So often, in fact, that it might feel more like a process than an opportunity. A have-to-do instead of something that could really make a difference in the experience of that employee. A requirement involving a series of tasks rather than a chance to build a long-term relationship.

In a report by the Society for Human Resource Management, Onboarding New Employees: Maximizing Success, onboarding is defined as the thing that helps new hires adjust to the social and performance aspects of their jobs, so they can quickly become productive, contributing members of the organization. Done well…it might even distinguish your organization as a great place to work.

Yet, despite the opportunity companies have to set themselves apart, we see them limiting their new employees to an experience that simply consists of getting to know the names of their co-workers, learning a little bit about the company history and shadowing someone who does the job they will do.

But, it doesn't have to be that way. Come along on a journey. One where your employee's introduction to your organization is more than meeting a few people, signing their new hire paperwork and learning how to clock in and out. This journey is more of an experience. And, as with any good experience, it has been thoughtfully planned with attention given to what we want to create for our new team member--a spirit of inclusion and opportunity that ultimately reinforces the decision made to join the organization and sets the foundation for a long-standing employment relationship.

This is a journey from introduction to integration.

The Introduction Gap

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Coming up in July 2018...

Hotel Spa: Oasis Unplugged

The driving force in current hotel spa trends is the effort to manage unprecedented levels of stress experienced by their clients. Feeling increasingly overwhelmed by demanding careers and technology overload, people are craving places where they can go to momentarily escape the rigors of their daily lives. As a result, spas are positioning themselves as oases of unplugged human connection, where mindfulness and contemplation activities are becoming increasingly important. One leading hotel spa offers their clients the option to experience their treatments in total silence - no music, no talking, and no advice from the therapist - just pure unadulterated silence. Another leading hotel spa is working with a reputable medical clinic to develop a “digital detox” initiative, in which clients will be encouraged to unplug from their devices and engage in mindfulness activities to alleviate the stresses of excessive technology use. Similarly, other spas are counseling clients to resist allowing technology to monopolize their lives, and to engage in meditation and gratitude exercises in its place. The goal is to provide clients with a warm, inviting and tranquil sanctuary from the outside world, in addition to also providing genuine solutions for better sleep, proper nutrition, stress management and natural self-care. To accomplish this, some spas are incorporating a variety of new approaches - cryotherapy, Himalayan salt therapy and ayurveda treatments are becoming increasingly popular. Other spas are growing their own herbs and performing their treatments in lush outdoor gardens. Some spa therapists are being trained to assess a client's individual movement patterns to determine the most beneficial treatment specifically for them. The July issue of the Hotel Business Review will report on these trends and developments and examine how some hotel spas are integrating them into their operations.