Best and Next Practices in the Service Sector Workplace

By Grace Kaucic Associate Marketing Manager, TDn2K | March 18, 2018

Co-authored by Joni Doolin, CEO & Founder, TDn2K and People Report

Attracting and retaining enough qualified employees has become one of the most pressing issues facing the service sector today, particularly the restaurant industry. With the national unemployment rate reaching its lowest levels since 2001, the constricted labor market is placing great strain on operators trying to recruit and hold onto their skilled employees. 

Employee Retention - Why is it a Problem?

Employee turnover rates for both management and hourly restaurant employees have now reached record highs. Over 70 percent of all restaurant employees, including front-of-house, back-of-house and management employees, are leaving voluntarily. Furthermore, the top reasons for voluntary termination are job dissatisfaction and opportunities for higher pay elsewhere.  

This level of turnover has proven to be extremely costly in more ways than one. The latest data shows that turnover in the restaurant industry now costs over $2,000 per hourly employee and over $15,000 per management employee. Additionally, TDn2K research also shows how high employee turnover in a restaurant can have a seriously detrimental effect on sales and traffic. In fact, the worst performing chain restaurants, in terms of sales, reported over 20 percent higher management turnover and over 25 percent higher hourly turnover in the second quarter of 2017.

Best Practices Awards Highlight Performance

Choose a Social Network!

The social network you are looking for is not available.

Close

Hotel Newswire Headlines Feed  

Shayne Paddock
Anne Sandoval
Janelle Schwartz
Mary Gendron
Shawna Suckow
Sherry Heyl
Jay Hartz
Joyce Gioia
Michael Blake
Coming up in July 2018...

Hotel Spa: Oasis Unplugged

The driving force in current hotel spa trends is the effort to manage unprecedented levels of stress experienced by their clients. Feeling increasingly overwhelmed by demanding careers and technology overload, people are craving places where they can go to momentarily escape the rigors of their daily lives. As a result, spas are positioning themselves as oases of unplugged human connection, where mindfulness and contemplation activities are becoming increasingly important. One leading hotel spa offers their clients the option to experience their treatments in total silence - no music, no talking, and no advice from the therapist - just pure unadulterated silence. Another leading hotel spa is working with a reputable medical clinic to develop a “digital detox” initiative, in which clients will be encouraged to unplug from their devices and engage in mindfulness activities to alleviate the stresses of excessive technology use. Similarly, other spas are counseling clients to resist allowing technology to monopolize their lives, and to engage in meditation and gratitude exercises in its place. The goal is to provide clients with a warm, inviting and tranquil sanctuary from the outside world, in addition to also providing genuine solutions for better sleep, proper nutrition, stress management and natural self-care. To accomplish this, some spas are incorporating a variety of new approaches - cryotherapy, Himalayan salt therapy and ayurveda treatments are becoming increasingly popular. Other spas are growing their own herbs and performing their treatments in lush outdoor gardens. Some spa therapists are being trained to assess a client's individual movement patterns to determine the most beneficial treatment specifically for them. The July issue of the Hotel Business Review will report on these trends and developments and examine how some hotel spas are integrating them into their operations.