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  • Sales & Marketing
  • Anatomy of a Hotel Sales Manager

  • Not everyone is cut out for sales - especially cold calling. Quite frankly, few are. Finding those few natural, exceptional people can be a challenge in any environment, but especially now when so many people are looking for jobs. With a single job posting you can be inundated with cover letters and resumes, many of whom are not the slightest bit qualified. Still others look great on paper but turn out to be a big mistake a week into the job.

    So how do you find the right people for your sales team? There are a few key qualities to look for in every sales manager you hire. These characteristics have nothing to do with their job history. While experience is obviously a factor, the people who exhibit the following traits naturally are the ones who will bring you the most success.

    A People Person

    One of the easier characteristics to identify is the ability to get along easily with anyone and everyone. You want someone who likes walking into a room of strangers and introducing themselves. But it's more than just being outgoing. As any good DOS knows, hotel sales is all about building relationships with meeting planners. And with so many ...

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Hotel Business Review Sales & Marketing

Bonnie Knutson
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Jim McAvoy
Coming up in March 2019...

Human Resources: An Era of Transition

Traditionally, the human resource department administers five key areas within a hotel operation - compliance, compensation and benefits, organizational dynamics, selection and retention, and training and development. However, HR professionals are also presently involved in culture-building activities, as well as implementing new employee on-boarding practices and engagement initiatives. As a result, HR professionals have been elevated to senior leadership status, creating value and profit within their organization. Still, they continue to face some intractable issues, including a shrinking talent pool and the need to recruit top-notch employees who are empowered to provide outstanding customer service. In order to attract top-tier talent, one option is to take advantage of recruitment opportunities offered through colleges and universities, especially if they have a hospitality major. This pool of prospective employees is likely to be better educated and more enthusiastic than walk-in hires. Also, once hired, there could be additional training and development opportunities that stem from an association with a college or university. Continuing education courses, business conferences, seminars and online instruction - all can be a valuable source of employee development opportunities. In addition to meeting recruitment demands in the present, HR professionals must also be forward-thinking, anticipating the skills that will be needed in the future to meet guest expectations. One such skill that is becoming increasingly valued is “resilience”, the ability to “go with the flow” and not become overwhelmed by the disruptive influences  of change and reinvention. In an era of transition—new technologies, expanding markets, consolidation of brands and businesses, and modifications in people's values and lifestyles - the capacity to remain flexible, nimble and resilient is a valuable skill to possess. The March Hotel Business Review will examine some of the strategies that HR professionals are employing to ensure that their hotel operations continue to thrive.