Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Suttle

Denise Suttle

Assistant Director of Convention Services, Albuquerque Convention & Visitors Bureau

Denise Suttle, CMP, has been with the Albuquerque CVB since moving to New Mexico from Oklahoma in 1991. She is the Assistant Director of Convention Services, working with citywide conventions that utilize the Albuquerque Convention Center and multiple hotels, sports events, and hotel meetings of all kinds. Ms. Suttle began at the CVB in convention sales as a telemarketer, earned increasingly responsible sales positions and eventually served as the division’s interim vice president. Her switch to convention services was based on a desire to follow through with the relationships built during the sales process, to help her clients experience the best possible convention with her hands-on approach. Ms. Suttle sees each client as a potential partner and friend, and feels the convention is as much her responsibility as the meeting planner’s. She believes that a successful CVB services manager must advocate for the customer, the city and the venues all at the same time—a juggling act that requires focus, patience and—above all—passion for customer service. A member of PCMA since 1996 and ESPA since 2000, Ms. Suttle has served on the board of directors, is past chairman of the marketing & communications committee, former editor of the quarterly E-newsletter “ACOMmodate,” and was a member of the continuing education committee. Ms. Suttle was part of the team responsible for writing the chapter on Convention Services Managers for the fifth edition of Professional Meeting Management published in 2005 by PCMA. She has participated in numerous panel presentations for ESPA and PCMA, and has presented convention services as a career path during Mega Mentor sessions of the PCMA Student Track. Please visit http://www.espaonline.org for more information.

Ms. Suttle can be contacted at 1-800-733-9918 ext, 3335 or suttle@itsatrip.org

Coming up in March 2018...

Human Resources: Value Creation

Businesses must evolve to stay competitive and this is also true of employment positions within those organizations. In the hotel industry, for example, the role that HR professionals perform continues to broaden and expand. Today, they are generally responsible for five key areas - government compliance; payroll and benefits; employee acquisition and retention; training and development; and organizational structure and culture. In this enlarged capacity, HR professionals are no longer seen as part of an administrative cost center, but rather as a member of the leadership team that creates strategic value within their organization. HR professionals help to define company policies and plans; enact and enforce systems of accountability; and utilize definable metrics to measure and justify outcomes. Of course, there are always new issues for HR professionals to address. Though seemingly safe for the moment, will the Affordable Care Act ultimately be repealed and replaced and, if so, what will the ramifications be? There are issues pertaining to Millennials in the workforce and women in leadership roles, as well as determining the appropriate use of social media within the organization. There are new onboarding processes and e-learning training platforms to evaluate, in addition to keeping abreast of political issues like the minimum wage hike movement, or the re-evaluation of overtime rules. Finally, there are genuine immigration and deportation issues that affect HR professionals, especially if they are located in Dreamer Cities, or employ a workforce that could be adversely impacted by federal government policies. The March Hotel Business Review will take a look at some of the issues, strategies and techniques that HR professionals are employing to create and sustain value in their organization.