June Focus     Sales & Marketing: Technology Rules

Zoe Connolly

All of us in the hospitality industry must stay focused on the clients that brought us success prior to the crisis. Even without a crystal ball, I'll go out on a limb and predict a future where businesses, and life, are still with us. Things will be different. By design, and out of necessity, behaviors and attitudes will shift. Technology will play an ever-greater role, helping us to approach things in entirely new ways. Undoubtedly, there's a lot we'll be surprised by. From where I sit, there's also a lot to be hopeful about.

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Trending articles this week...

Steven Ferry

PART II. Last week, we looked at how the official response to the pandemic morphed from great concern about the danger; to numbness at the economic devastation (the UN World Tourism Organization estimated earnings down 80% on 2019 and the loss of 120 million jobs); to increasing rejection of the absurd. This week in Part 2 we review how a draconian censorship of the medical community is being enforced not just in China, as one might expect, but also in the Western world; we examine the information that has been hidden so enthusiastically from you, and finally explain why almost every action taken by authorities has been at variance with impartial science and common sense. READ MORE

Mandeep S. Lamba, MRICS

While the extent of global financial distress is still uncertain on account of its enormity and the virus being nowhere near control, what is certain is that the world will soon be grappling with several changes of a permanent nature that will become the "new normal." These will be in the form of products, services, and the several life choices we make in our everyday life as we gradually, over time, put the memory of this pandemic behind us and move on. Here are some trends and changes that will likely be seen in hotels across the world. READ MORE

David Ashen

Creating a hotel brand that resonates means far more than designing an eye-catching logo and putting together a style guide. A brand should evoke a feeling, according to David Ashen, president & CEO of interior design and brand consulting firm dash design. In this article, he explores how hotels can imagine a dynamic environment and a service culture that, alongside sharp design, creates magic that few brands have yet to fully tap. Most of all, Ashen implores hoteliers to define if they are a head, heart or gut brand and to bravely lead from that revelation. READ MORE

Lucheng Wang

As the exponential growth of the Covid-19 pandemic has wreaked worldwide havoc and forever altered life as we know it, the food and beverage industry has nearly been decimated over the past three months. Ongoing efforts by the entire food and beverage industry, as well as local, state, and national governmental agencies have been successful at mitigating the devastating effects of this virus. While the overall impact has still yet to be determined, it is abundantly clear that we all have a role in defeating this common enemy and that valid and reliable data needs to be made available for future research and analysis. READ MORE

Coming up in July 2020...

Hotel Spa: Back to Nature

As the Wellness Industry continues to expand, hotel spas are also diversifying, placing a greater emphasis on overall well-being. For some spas, this means providing clients with all-inclusive packages that include fitness classes, healthy dining, and offsite leisure activities, in addition to their core services. For example, spas near ski resorts are offering packages that include lift passes, pre-ski yoga sessions, after-ski dinners and spa treatments. Other spas are offering packages that include massages, saunas, mineral baths, hot springs, and recreational hiking and snowmobile activities. These kinds of spa offerings are also part of a "Back to Nature" movement that encourages guests to get out and experience the healing qualities of nature. One such therapy is the Japanese practice known as "forest bathing" which has become popular with spas that are near wooded areas. This practice relies on the ancient power of a forest for promoting a sense of health and well-being. Other spas are incorporating precious metals and stones into their health and beauty treatments - such as silver, gold, pearls and amber. Silver ion baths relax the body and mind, reduce fatigue, and restore energy balance. Gold keeps skin radiant and can even treat various skin diseases and infections, due to its antibacterial qualities. Amber is used to calm the nervous system and to relieve stress. Other natural products and therapies that are increasingly in demand include sound therapy, cryotherapy, infra-red saunas, and even CBD oil, which is being used in massages, facials and foot scrubs, providing a new form of stress relief. The July issue of the Hotel Business Review will document these trends and other new developments, and report on how some hotel spas are integrating them into their operations.