Hotel Business Review: Week of Jul 25, 2016

Marcus  Nicolls
  • Revenue Management
  • Dollars & Sense: Merging Cultures Post-M&A
  • A super platinum-everything status guest with a certain brand hotel chain walked into one of his favorite properties after this brand recently merged with another chain, looked around and said, “It just isn’t the same. I don’t even recognize them anymore.” He then walked out of the door determined to find a new favorite property he could count on. Does this sound far-fetched to you? It shouldn’t; it happens all too often, and it should send chills down every leader’s spine. While this anecdote focuses on the guest, you can imagine the impact this would also have on the employees. Read on...

Michael  Coughlin
  • Technology: Search Engines
  • Using Paid Search for Hotels to Maximize Your Return
  • Since its infancy in the late 90s and early 2000s, paid search has been a highly effective tactic for capturing would-be travelers that are actively exploring travel options. There’s seemingly no better way to attain a new hotel guest than by delivering an ad promoting your hotel when someone is searching for “hotels” in your market area. For instance, if you are promoting hotel rooms in Las Vegas, you would likely deliver relevant ads to people searching for keywords such as “Las Vegas hotel,” “Las Vegas hotels,” and “Vegas hotel reviews. ”According to Prognosis Digital, 79% of people that book hotels online search for that particular hotel on a search engine before buying. Thus, having a presence on search engines is essential for any hotel. Read on...

Mark  Sisson
  • Eco-Friendly Practices
  • Want a Better Guest Experience? Make Clean Visible.
  • In 2012, my business partner and I invented a line of self­cleaning surfaces for healthcare facilities which we named NanoSeptic because they were based on nanotechnology. We knew hospitals were having a challenge with hospital­acquired infections (HAI), some of which were being spread through contact with high traffic touch points. So our mission was to deliver an actual health benefit, creating healthier hospital environments by creating self­cleaning surfaces for places that had the greatest chance of cross contamination. We never dreamed that these surfaces would be adopted by other industries, and more surprisingly, why they would be adopted. We found that the visible nature of the products fundamentally change how people viewed the concept of “clean.” What we came to understand was just how scared people are about the cleanliness of public facilities and how much their perception of a facility changed when a visible indication of cleaning efforts was present. Read on...

Steven Ferry
  • Guest Service / Customer Experience Mgmt
  • Emotional Engagement - A Mantra in Search of a Technology
  • Emotional engagement is one of those hot subjects that most have heard of but very few can actually define. What is it exactly? As with any subject, a keen observation of life in action followed by a logical analysis can shine light on the dark corners of our knowledge to bring clarity to our understanding, and, in order to be useful, a workable procedure for action that brings about desirable results. In the case of emotional engagement, it would be guests who are thrilled at the renewal or reinforcement of life and energy they experience when interacting with hotel staff. Of course, that would presuppose and require that the staff be passionate and full-of-life themselves, rather than uninspired and going through the motions. Read on...

JULY: Hotel Spa: Front and Center

Deborah   Smith

Widespread enthusiasm for a natural hot springs experience over the last ten years has growing numbers of wellness- and recreation-oriented consumers in America building their travel and vacation plans around these scenic destinations. Places where simple enjoyment of Mother Nature, outdoor recreation, and the pleasure of total relaxation are the main attractions. Wellness and recreation-based tourism centered around hot mineral springs is estimated to be a $50 billion global industry according to the Global Wellness Institute (GWI), a Miami-based think tank that has published several research reports concerning the global hot springs market in the past few years. Read on...

Mark  Grenoble

One of the big shifts in the spa and wellness movement that I have seen over the past few years is in the mindset of the spa-goer. What used to be a singular spa experience to relax the body, release tension in the muscles, and perhaps elevate one’s physical appearance, has now transgressed into something deeper. The spa experience is beginning to look beyond the physical body and instead, engage the mind. Spa-goers are seeking transformation focused not on changing who you are, but creating a more perfect version of yourself. Read on...

Michael G. Tompkins

Those of us lucky enough to work in the spa and wellness industry experience the pleasure of helping people day in, day out. However, from an executive perspective, there is one very common complaint: the industry doesn’t get the respect it deserves. There are times when it seems like the media and the investment industry only seem to care about the growth in the technology and biotechnology industries. What excites them is another gadget, an app, a new pill, or whatever other newfangled notion is “flavor of the month.” And yet the spa and wellness industry has also grown at a clip Read on...

Mia Kyricos

It is no secret that the hotel world has changed dramatically in the last few years. If we consider just the last decade (2006-2016), we’ve witnessed significant brand expansions and evolutions; experienced the trauma of one of the world’s worst recessions and subsequent halts in development pipelines around the globe; and now, acquisitions of some of the largest and most recognized hotel brands in the business. And that’s just on the industry side. On the consumer side of the equation, I think one of the greatest macro-trends to affect the way we attract and retain our customers is that today our guests are looking for experiences that positively Read on...

Coming Up In The August Online Hotel Business Review


{300x250.media}
Feature Focus
Food & Beverage: Going Casual
According to industry tracker PKF Hospitality Research, food and beverage sales represent the second- largest source of revenue for full-service hotels behind rooms. Given its financial importance, hotel operators are constantly adapting and evolving their F&B operations in order to remain current with industry trends and to meet (and exceed) guest expectations. Recent food developments which continue to proliferate include the farm-to-table movement; customized menus for those who are vegan, vegetarian, paleo or gluten-free; the appearance of smaller dishes on tasting menus; and creatively- prepared comfort foods served in more casual settings. In fact, there is a growing emphasis in the entire industry on more casual food operations. Customers are eschewing the typical breakfast-lunch- dinner/appetizer-entrée-dessert model in favor of "fast-casual" menus and service (think Panera, Chipotle or Cosi as examples). Even better if these menus are also available throughout the property, especially in social-gathering areas like the lobby, pool or bar. Some hotels are also experimenting with "pop-up" restaurants - a temporary dining option with edgy menus and design served in unexpected locations (like rooftops or lobbies) - as a way to keep things energetic and fresh. Another trend which applies to both food and wine is the option to purchase food and beverages in multiple sizes. Some operations are giving their customers the opportunity to choose - a three ounce pour of wine or a nine-ounce pour; a six-ounce filet or a twelve-ounce - the customers decide their portion size and pay accordingly. The August issue of the Hotel Business Review will document all these trends and challenges in the food and beverage sector, and report on what some leading hotels are doing to enhance this area of their business.