Hotel Business Review: Week of Nov 23, 2015

Pamela Barnhill
  • Sales & Marketing
  • Refresher: What IS a Hotel Brand?
  • Does a brand have certain attributes? Do legacy brands include their new “soft” brands? Are so-called collection companies brands? With so many extensions and iterations, it’s only natural to pose such questions. Is a brand a legacy brand or does it include the newly created soft brands? What about the collection companies, are those brands? Read on...

Ken Hutcheson
  • Eco-Friendly Practices
  • Landscaping During a Drought
  • To help decrease the drought in California, the state has required that all agricultural suppliers be in compliance with the 2015 agricultural water management plan (AWMP) guidebook. But even with the new regulations and management practices in place, drought continues to harm those living on the West Coast. According to a 2014 study from the University of California-Davis, last year’s drought was likely to inflict $2.2 billion in losses on the agricultural industry. Harsh drought seasons have led to habitat destruction, wildfires, and have also caused entire landscapes to change. Read on...

Drew Patterson
  • Mobile Technology
  • Time for Hotels to Move Beyond the App
  • Service delivery is being changed in a fundamental way, and guest communication is at the heart of this change. Multi-channel mobile communication allows hotels to have more touch points with the guest before, during, and after their stay. When done right, a smart mobile strategy will bring hotels closer to their guests. Because the tools are so easy to use and access, a large percentage of guests will use it and appreciate it. These interactions are at the heart of how we interact with and serve guests; they aren’t just marketing channels. Read on...

Tammy  Farley
  • Sales & Marketing
  • Rate Shopping: The Importance of Being Nimble
  • When it comes to rate shopping, most properties and management companies know they need it – and they need it now. This article outlines the advances that are being made to make rate shopping faster, friendlier and more flexible by illustrating the state of the art, citing case studies of successful users. Read on...


NOVEMBER: Hotel Architecture and Design: Unique, Timeless and Memorable Design

Samuel J. Cicero Sr.

No matter how glamorous, there comes a time when every hotel requires renovation. Years of wear and tear, new fashion trends, and shifts in technology can prematurely age a property, leading to customer complaints and the need to lower room rates to remain competitive. Also, in this age of social media and online reviews, an aging property means lost revenue as travelers increasingly turn to the Internet for advice and not the hotel’s website. Read on...

Patricia  Lopez

Guestrooms are getting smaller. With trendy micro and capsule hotels on the rise, brands everywhere are working with designers to shave off square footage and conceptualize new and improved layouts that use space more efficiently. But designing a versatile room is only functional to a point. If you want to create a space that responds to your guests’ needs without compromising the elements that turn a simple hotel stay into a luxury, then you have to strike a balance between tradition and innovation. And it all comes back to the art of crafting an experience. Read on...

Pat McBride

The designs of the most renowned hotels and resorts give careful consideration to every aspect of a guest’s experience. This is no small task – the design team leads the way to ensuring a property has everything it needs to offer a memorable, comfortable and relaxing stay for customers, which ultimately determines the success of a property. Complicating matters is the fact that designers very rarely need to consider just one type of customer – there are honeymooners, young families, empty nesters, groups of friends and wedding parties to consider in the design process. The task of designing for still another subset of customers – business travelers – presents an interesting but surmountable design challenge. This is a group growing more and more accustomed to mixing business with leisure. Designing a property that appeals to business travelers, a critical source of revenue for many properties today, requires its own set of considerations that must be weaved seamlessly throughout the design of the property, from meeting and conference spaces to restaurants and guestrooms and beyond. Read on...

Patrick Burke

Encompassing over 3.5 million square feet with a price tag of $4.4 billion, Resorts World Sentosa is one of the world's largest multi-recreational luxury parks. A city-within-a-city, the resort features six hotels, offering a total of 1,840 rooms; a large casino; a convention center, including a 7,000-square-meter ballroom, conference and meeting facilities; a multitude of theaters and entertainment facilities; a maritime museum, a large marine animal park and water park; a world-class spa and extensive retail stores and restaurants. Anchored by Universal Studios Singapore, the project required a design approach that would celebrate the unique site in a very special way. Read on...

Coming Up In The December Online Hotel Business Review

Feature Focus
Hotel Law: Legal Issues Looming Large in 2015
In an industry where people are on-property 24/7/365, the possibilities are endless for legal issues to arise stemming from hotel guest concerns. And given the sheer enormity of the international hotel industry, issues pertaining to business, franchise, investment and real estate law are equally immense. Finally, given the huge numbers of diverse people who are employed in the hospitality industry, whether in hotel operations or food and beverage, legal issues pertaining to labor, union, immigration and employment law are also significant and substantial. The expertise of all kinds of specialists and practitioners is required to administer the legal issues within the hotel industry, and though the subject areas are vast and varied, there are numerous issues which will be in the forefront in 2015 and beyond. One issue that is gaining traction is how hotels are dealing with the use of marijuana by employees, given its ever-changing legal status. The use of marijuana is now legal in 21 states and the District of Columbia for certain medical conditions. Two other states, Colorado and Washington, have legalized recreational marijuana use for individuals who are 21 years old or older, and Alaska and Oregon currently have similar legislation pending. Most state laws legalizing marijuana do not address the employment issues implicated by these statutes. Therefore, it is incumbent on all hotel operators to be aware of the laws in their states and to adjust their employment policies accordingly regarding marijuana use by their employees. Other issues that are currently looming large pertain to guest identity theft by hotel employees and the legal liabilities which ensue; issues of property surveillance versus a guest’s right to privacy; and immigration reform could also be a major compliance issue. The December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine some of the more critical issues involving hotel law and how some managers are addressing them in their operations.