Hotel Business Review: Week of May 30, 2016

Albert Pucciarelli
  • Hospitality Law
  • The Pros and Cons of Mediation in Hotel Disputes
  • As a lawyer involved for over 30 years in the drafting and negotiation of contracts for the hospitality industry, I can assure you that disputes are inevitable. Even among parties such as owners and management companies that have the best working relationships, there will nevertheless be issues that cause discord. Read on...

Camille Hoheb
  • Spas, Health & Fitness
  • Global Wellness Day: Why Hotels Should be Involved
  • A hotel’s vitality hinges on the guest experience. Out of all the business trends, none is more powerful than the growing wellness movement. Wellness is everywhere. This is especially true in tourism, with healthy amenities at airports, airlines and lodging. Healthy hotel brands are leading the way and other properties are following suite. Hotels deliver healthy options related to physical, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, environmental and social wellbeing. Read on...

Ken Hutcheson
  • Eco-Friendly Practices
  • How to Create a Comfortable Landscape Environment for Guests
  • Making guests feel comfortable during their stay is a critical part of a guests’ overall experience. Whether they’re traveling for business or pleasure, hoteliers to create the right environment—from the interior to the exterior—to satisfy guests’ expectations and make them feel at home. For example, business travelers are looking for clean and efficient features, while vacationers are looking for features that will help them unwind and relax. Read on...

Kelly  McGuire
  • Revenue Management
  • Price, UGC and Loyalty
  • With the growing presence of UGC, consumers have more information than ever before when they are making a hotel room purchase. The question is: how do consumers use all this information, with price, to establish value and ultimately make a purchase decision? Understanding this, particularly across different segments of guests, will help hotels make better pricing and positioning decisions. The unmanaged business traveler represents a large and very valuable segment for hotels. This group of frequent travelers is potentially highly influenced by their loyalty affiliation. Does their loyalty change their reaction to price and UGC? Read on...

MAY: Eco-Friendly Practices: Doing Well by Doing Good

Sarah Harkness

“Oh great,” you must be thinking. “Another article about Millennials. Haven’t we exhausted this topic already?” Trust me, as a Millennial I understand your frustration. Feeling like you are consistently labeled as lazy, entitled, distracted, and a contributor to the demise of the English language isn’t good for one’s self-esteem. I am not here to argue with whatever preconceptions that you may or may not have about my generation, instead I want to tell you what I do know, and why it is important for you as a travel brand to at least try and understand the collective “us”. Read on...

DJ  Vallauri

A lot has been said and written about the “millennial traveler” and how “different” their travel and hotel needs are. How connected and ambitious they are, the young movers and the shakers in the modern business world. In fact, nearly every major hotel brand believes millennial travelers are seeking new places to stay when traveling, new experiences, new ways to connect, new ways to stay healthy while on the road and so on. New millennial brands continue to launch onto the scene. Brands like Marriott’s Moxy, Hilton’s TRU, Starwood’s Aloft and Hyatt’s Centric all seeking to be positioned to grab the growing share of millennial traveler. Read on...

Carolyn  Childs

Globally the influence of Millennials on travel and on marketing has been profound. In the US, Millennials are as large a generation cohort as Baby Boomers . In China, they are a smaller generation numerically thanks to the one child policy. But as the first generation to benefit from China’s astonishing economic growth, 80s children (as they are known) are a wealthy and high-consuming group. The word Millennial has almost become synonymous with youth. But that is about to change. Read on...

Jonathan Bailey

There are roughly 80 million millennials in the United States, and each year they spend approximately $600 billion. Clearly, marketers have recognized this group and are scrambling to reach out to them, connect in a relevant way and convince them of brand relevancy. Some are missing a big opportunity for success, however, because they are operating under the false assumption that all millennials belong in the same gigantic group. There is more than meets the untrained eye here, and properly targeting millennials is a multi-faceted, complicated effort. If you’re like me, you are inundated with articles, webinars and conferences Read on...

Coming Up In The June Online Hotel Business Review


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Feature Focus
Sales & Marketing: The Rise of the Millennials
Hotel Sales & Marketing departments have endured massive change in the past few years in terms of how they conduct their business, and there is little evidence to suggest that things will be slowing down anytime soon. Technological advances continue to determine how they research, analyze, plan, engage and ultimately sell to their customers. Though "traditional" marketing is still in the mix, there has been a major shift in focus toward online marketing. First and foremost is an understanding of who their primary audience is and how to market to them. Millennials (those born between 1981-1997) are the fastest growing customer segment in the hospitality industry, and they are expected to represent 50% of all travelers by 2025. With the rise of millennial consumers, sales and marketing efforts will need to be more transparent and tech savvy, with a strong emphasis on empathy and personal customer connection. Social media is essential for this demographic and they expect hotels to engage them accordingly. Other targeted groups include cultural buffs, foodies, LGBT, and multi-generational travelers - all of whom are seeking novel experiences tailored specifically to their interests and needs. Finally the Baby Boomers are still a force to be reckoned with. They are currently the wealthiest generation and are becoming increasingly tech savvy, with 33% of internet users now falling into this demographic. It is imperative that hotels include this generation when it comes to their 2016 digital marketing strategies. The June Hotel Business Review will examine some of these markets and report on what some sales and marketing professionals are doing to address them.