April Guest Service: A Culture of YES

Trending articles this week...

Kurt Meister

While a slip or fall remains the most common cause of guest injuries, a hotel's largest risk exposure may lie in the water. Legionella outbreaks have been reported at several hotels nationwide. This deadly bacterium can be fatal. When it spreads, it affects multiple guests. And when your hotel receives a claim, you may not be covered if your insurance policy includes a bacteria exclusion. This article walks through common causes of guest injuries – from legionella and E. coli to bed bugs and molestation – and offers best practices for preventing injuries, protecting your hotel and safeguarding your guests. Read on...

Bonnie Knutson

Somewhere along the way, we came to believe that all it takes to generate value, loyalty, and great ambassadors for our hotel are outstanding facilities, programs, and services. And don't forget those loyalty programs. While that may have been true back in the 20th Century, it is no longer enough in 2019; these qualities are just expected in a hotel. To provide the kind of experiences that will drive guest value and hotel revenues, it takes more than top facilities and good service. In this article, you will learn how a Gum Ball Machine can point your way into this Experience Economy. Read on...

Herve Tardy

In the quest to put the customer first, many hotel chains are reevaluating their approach to IT. The advancement of cloud services, Internet of Things (IoT) technology and enhanced mobile connectivity has created new possibilities to improve the guest experience. However, capitalizing on these capabilities means moving away from traditional, centralized IT and implementing a hybrid IT system. Migration brings its own set of challenges when it comes to network and power management. In this article, global power management company Eaton addresses these challenges and shares strategies to help companies improve critical data protection as they shift toward decentralized IT. Read on...

Priyanko Guchait, PhD

Approximately 48 million people annually are sickened due to foodborne illness, which equates to roughly one sixth the population of the United States (U.S.), with128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths per year. The estimated annual economic costs related to foodborne illness are approximately $77 billion. Foodborne illness is an urgent problem that threatens the health of people and generates significant economic losses. How can hotels and restaurants take action to reduce the alarming numbers of food safety errors and violations? Read on...

Coming up in May 2019...

Eco-Friendly Practices: Corporate Social Responsibility

The hotel industry has undertaken a long-term effort to build more responsible and socially conscious businesses. What began with small efforts to reduce waste - such as paperless checkouts and refillable soap dispensers - has evolved into an international movement toward implementing sustainable development practices. In addition to establishing themselves as good corporate citizens, adopting eco-friendly practices is sound business for hotels. According to a recent report from Deloitte, 95% of business travelers believe the hotel industry should be undertaking “green” initiatives, and Millennials are twice as likely to support brands with strong management of environmental and social issues. Given these conclusions, hotels are continuing to innovate in the areas of environmental sustainability. For example, one leading hotel chain has designed special elevators that collect kinetic energy from the moving lift and in the process, they have reduced their energy consumption by 50%  over conventional elevators. Also, they installed an advanced air conditioning system which employs a magnetic mechanical system that makes them more energy efficient. Other hotels are installing Intelligent Building Systems which monitor and control temperatures in rooms, common areas and swimming pools, as well as ventilation and cold water systems. Some hotels are installing Electric Vehicle charging stations, planting rooftop gardens, implementing stringent recycling programs, and insisting on the use of biodegradable materials. Another trend is the creation of Green Teams within a hotel's operation that are tasked to implement earth-friendly practices and manage budgets for green projects. Some hotels have even gone so far as to curtail or eliminate room service, believing that keeping the kitchen open 24/7 isn't terribly sustainable. The May issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some hotels are doing to integrate sustainable practices into their operations and how they are benefiting from them.