Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. King

Tim King

Design Director, Luxlo

Tim King is the principal designer for Luxlo, a luxury London-based residential developer, which is now making its first foray into Beverly Hills. Mr. King has collaborated with some of most iconic innovators and trendsetters in the hospitality and lifestyle space and recently completed a total redesign of Mosaic Hotel.

Through his diverse experience in all aspects of architecture, design, space planning and project management, Mr. King has developed the distinct daring style he is best known for today—bold interiors that strike a playful balance between the classic and the contemporary.

Born and raised in West London, Mr. King's family was always involved in real estate, hence his early inspiration. He attended boarding school, where he received a well-rounded education. During summers and holidays, he traveled extensively with his family, taking in arts & architectural experiences from around the world.

Inspired by his travels, Mr. King went on to study interior architecture at Brighton University before securing a job with Northacre, a high-end development firm in London. During this time, he worked on prestigious projects from large residential homes to several projects in Dubai, a palace in Riyadh and a 55-meter Super yacht built in Holland.

After 12 years, Mr. King took his current position for Luxlo, where he has now served as the design director for five years. Among Luxlo's most notable achievements are 77 MAYFAIR, an iconic residential development in Central London, which has achieved record prices and the recent redesign of Mosaic Hotel in Los Angeles.

Please visit www.l-design.com for more information.

Mr. King can be contacted at 442036644035 or tim@luxlo.co.uk

Coming up in July 2020...

Hotel Spa: Back to Nature

As the Wellness Industry continues to expand, hotel spas are also diversifying, placing a greater emphasis on overall well-being. For some spas, this means providing clients with all-inclusive packages that include fitness classes, healthy dining, and offsite leisure activities, in addition to their core services. For example, spas near ski resorts are offering packages that include lift passes, pre-ski yoga sessions, after-ski dinners and spa treatments. Other spas are offering packages that include massages, saunas, mineral baths, hot springs, and recreational hiking and snowmobile activities. These kinds of spa offerings are also part of a "Back to Nature" movement that encourages guests to get out and experience the healing qualities of nature. One such therapy is the Japanese practice known as "forest bathing" which has become popular with spas that are near wooded areas. This practice relies on the ancient power of a forest for promoting a sense of health and well-being. Other spas are incorporating precious metals and stones into their health and beauty treatments - such as silver, gold, pearls and amber. Silver ion baths relax the body and mind, reduce fatigue, and restore energy balance. Gold keeps skin radiant and can even treat various skin diseases and infections, due to its antibacterial qualities. Amber is used to calm the nervous system and to relieve stress. Other natural products and therapies that are increasingly in demand include sound therapy, cryotherapy, infra-red saunas, and even CBD oil, which is being used in massages, facials and foot scrubs, providing a new form of stress relief. The July issue of the Hotel Business Review will document these trends and other new developments, and report on how some hotel spas are integrating them into their operations.