Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Van Slyke

Erik Van Slyke

Managing Director, Solleva

Erik Van Slyke is a change leader, executive coach, author, blogger and educator who advises some of the world's leading organizations how to create and navigate change, improve organizational collaboration and develop human capital. As managing director of Solleva, he helps organizations plan for, implement and manage change by coaching change leaders and strengthening project team capability.  His innovative approach to leading project-based change was named a Best Idea in HR by Human Resource Executive. With more than two decades in consulting and HR leadership roles, Mr. Van Slyke's clients include both domestic and global organizations across a broad range of industries.

Prior to Solleva he led the Northeast Human Capital Management practice at Buck Consultants and held senior consulting roles with Deloitte and SHL. In addition, Mr. Van Slyke served as the executive vice president of human resources for Reuters Americas. Mr. Van Slyke's blog is read in more than 80 countries around the world, and his articles and quotes on change, operational strategy and conflict resolution have appeared in publications that include The Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, Fortune, Business Horizons, CIO, and HR Executive. His book, Listening to Conflict (AMACOM Books), was named by Soundview's Executive Summaries as a Top 30 Business Book of 1999, published in multiple languages and reissued in paperback on its tenth anniversary.

As an educator, Mr. Van Slyke has held adjunct faculty roles with Auburn University and Centenary College (NJ) where he has taught courses in business strategy, management and entrepreneurship. His research explores organizational change, leadership practice and development, and transformational learning.

Mr. Van Slyke received his MBA from the Kenan-Flagler Business School of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and his BA in psychology from Hobart College.

Please visit http://www.solleva.com for more information.

Mr. Van Slyke can be contacted at 646-623-4823 or erik.vanslyke@solleva.com

Coming up in March 2020...

Human Resources: Confronting a Labor Shortage

With the unemployment rate at its lowest level in decades (3.7%), what has always been a perennial problem for human resource professionals - labor shortage - is now reaching acute levels of concern. It is getting harder to find and recruit qualified applicants. Even finding candidates with the skills to succeed in entry-level positions has become an issue. In addition, employee turnover rates remain extremely high in the hotel industry. As a result of these problems, hotel HR managers are having to rethink their recruitment strategies in order to hire the right talent for the right job. First, hotels have been forced to raise their wages and offer other appealing perks, as a way to attract qualified candidates. Secondly, HR managers are reassessing their interviewing techniques, focusing less on the answers they receive to questions and more on observable behavior. Part of this process includes role-playing during the interview, so that the recruiter can gauge how a candidate works through specific problems and interacts with other team members. Additionally, some HR managers are also creating internal talent pools as a way to address labor shortages. Instead of utilizing department resources to find new hires with specific skills for needed positions, hotels are cultivating talent pools internally and preparing their employees to assume leadership roles whenever the time comes. They are also placing greater emphasis on a company culture that is more performance-based, as a way to curb employee turnover, increase employee satisfaction, and assure higher levels of customer service. Finally, recognizing the importance of employee retention as a way to lessen the impact of a tight labor market, some HR managers are instituting generous reward programs in order to retain their top performers. The March Hotel Business Review will explore what some HR professionals are doing to address these and other issues in their departments.