Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Rosenberg

Charles B. Rosenberg

Attorney, White & Case LLP

Charles (Chip) B. Rosenberg is an attorney in the Washington, DC office of White & Case LLP, where he represents private parties and foreign governments in complex international arbitrations. He has experience representing clients in disputes at the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID) and the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), as well as under the arbitration rules of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL). Mr. Rosenberg is the Associate Managing Editor of the World Arbitration & Mediation Review (WAMR) and a Regional Representative of the ICC Young Arbitrators Forum (ICC YAF). He has taught advanced international investment seminars at The Hague University of Applied Sciences in The Netherlands and at the American University Washington College of Law in Washington, DC. He regularly speaks at conferences and publishes articles on international arbitration related topics. Mr. Rosenberg was named a Future Leader in Who's Who Legal: Arbitration 2017, an inaugural edition focused on outstanding attorneys aged 45 or under, which described him as “hardworking and approachable.” He also has been repeatedly recognized as a “Rising Star” by DC Super Lawyers. Prior to joining White & Case LLP, Mr. Rosenberg spent two years in The Hague, Netherlands clerking for The Honorable Charles N. Brower, who at the time was ranked the “world's busiest arbitrator” by The American Lawyer in terms of large international arbitrations, and at the Iran-United States Claims Tribunal. Mr. Rosenberg graduated first in his class, summa cum laude, and Order of the Coif from the American University Washington College of Law.

Please visit http://www.whitecase.com for more information.

Mr. Rosenberg can be contacted at 202-729-2324 or charles.rosenberg@whitecase.com

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.