Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Gieselman

James Gieselman

Principal, Servidyne

Jim Gieselman is a principal in the consulting firm, Servidyne LLC based in Atlanta, Georgia. He rejoined the firm after a 5-year stint as principal with Emeritus Consulting LLC. Servidyne provides energy and sustainability consulting in the commercial and institutional building space. Mr. Gieselman provides leadership and experience in the breath of Servidyne's offerings including energy auditing, retro-commissioning, strategic planning and energy modeling. Previously he managed the operation of Servidyne's engineering group, providing energy and sustainability consulting services for commercial, institutional, and industrial facilities.

Mr. Gieselman has served as the corporate energy consultant to The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, advising their hotel properties throughout North America in the areas of energy efficiency and HVAC infrastructure. He was also instrumental in enhancing the functionality of fault detection / diagnostics software. He began his career with The Trane Company where he rose to the level of Manager, Industrial Sales and Application Engineering. After leaving Trane, he founded MJC, Inc., a manufacturing company dedicated to innovative customization of HVAC equipment.

Mr. Gieselman holds a B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Notre Dame and an MBA from The Robinson School of Business at Georgia State University. He is a registered Professional Engineer, a member of ASHRAE, and an ASHRAE certified Building Energy Assessment Professional (BEAP). Mr. Gieselman is also an instructor at Chattahoochee Technical College where he teaches an advanced HVAC course to building engineers for Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) Atlanta.

He has also authored a number of articles for various publications on the topic of energy and energy conservation.

Please visit http://www.servidyne.com for more information.

Mr. Gieselman can be contacted at 470-355-9014 or jim.gieselman@servidyne.com

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.