Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Lally

Bill Lally

President, Mode:Green

Bill Lally is the president of hospitality integration firm Mode:Green. A serial entrepreneur, Mr. Lally has extensive experience and a unique background in a variety of areas ranging from commercial audiovisual and control systems to energy management, broadcast, recording, post-production and hospitality.

In 2008, the culmination of this experience resulted in the successful foundation of Mode:Green, which provides advanced control systems and energy management in the hospitality and commercial markets with the goal of bridging the current gap between integrators, MEP engineers and contractors, GCs, lighting designers and architects.

Capitalizing on having become the first LEED-AP / Crestron Master's Level Certified programmer, Mr. Lally grew Mode:Green from a small independent programming house (with clients such as Disney, Four Seasons, Baccarat, 1 Hotel and even NASA), to an enterprise completing several fully integrated multi-million dollar projects over the past five years. Mode:Green has become the foremost authority in meeting the demands of the luxury hospitality market and the ever-changing technology expectations of the world's most advanced hotel guest rooms.

Mr. Lally is on top of new technology trends in the latest and upcoming audio/video, energy management and automation technologies to use in work for his clients, and is a continuous technology tinkerer on the side. He was also a founding member of the STEP InfoComm Task Force and is part of the InfoComm Smart Building Task Force, which drew on his ability to create energy management solutions for commercial buildings.

Mr. Lally attended the University of Miami for Music and Audio Engineering, and is a member of the US Green Building Council.

Please visit http://www.modegreen.com for more information.

Mr. Lally can be contacted at 407-574-6245 or blally@modegreen.com

Coming up in December 2020...

Hotel Law: Protecting Guest Privacy

Every business is obligated to protect their customers from identity theft but unfortunately, data breaches have become all too common. In an effort to protect a guest's right to privacy and to safeguard their personal data, the European Union passed a General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that could hold hotels legally liable for any breaches that expose a customer's sensitive personal information. Though the GDPR only pertains to EU citizens' data, any international business that mishandles their data can be legally responsible. Another legal issue of concern is the fight involving hotel "resort fees." Several states attorney generals have recently filed suit against two major hotel chains in an effort to litigate this practice. Their suit alleges that these companies are "engaged in deceptive and misleading pricing practices and their failure to disclose fees is in violation of consumer protection laws." The suit seeks to force the hotel chains to advertise the true price of their hotel rooms. There are several other legal issues that the industry is being forced to address. Sexual harassment prevention in the workplace is still top of mind for hotel employers-particularly in New York and California, which now statutorily require harassment training. Hotels and motels in California will also soon be required to train all their employees on human trafficking awareness. Immigration issues are also of major concern to hotel employers, especially in the midst of a severe labor shortage. The government is issuing fewer H2B visas for low-skilled workers, as well as J-1 visas for temporary workers. Though there is little hope for any comprehensive immigration reform, hotel lobbying groups are actively seeking legal remedies to alleviate this problem. These are just a few of the critical issues that the December issue of the Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.