Ms. Stevens

Wendy Stevens

Executive Vice President

First Hospitality Group

In her role as executive vice president of First Hospitality Group (FHG), Wendy Stevens is responsible for developing and executing company strategy at a high level, pinpointing valuable business opportunities, and scouting out the best of the best for our workforce. Disciplined and determined in her approach, every challenge that comes across her desk is met with a sense of urgency that guarantees results.

Ms. Stevens was exposed to the world of hospitality from an early age, becoming increasingly familiar with back-of-house operations as her mother lived and worked in a hotel. Despite her varied focuses in school, ranging from political science to fashion merchandising, it was the time spent working guest services in a front office during college that ultimately shaped her career path. Ms. Stevens joined FHG in 2001. Throughout her 14 years with FHG, the accomplishment about which she is most proud is the assemblage of her team of innovative leaders. When she joined FHG, there were only 17 hotels in the portfolio and only two other sales people. Since then, FHGs portfolio has more than tripled; departments dedicated to marketing and revenue management have been developed to offer more holistic and dedicated support, and a total sales department of three grew to a team of more than 20.

She attributes her success to the singular idea that there is nothing that you can't do; the only limits that we have, we set for ourselves. Ms. Stevens has truly seen hotels from every angle, from suburban 80-room select service hotels to 500-room downtown convention centers, giving her the knowledge and first-hand understanding necessary to excel in her collaboration with people at all levels.

Please visit http://www.fhginc.com for more information.

Ms. Stevens can be contacted at 224-257-4000 or wstevens@fhginc.com

Coming Up In The November Online Hotel Business Review




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Feature Focus
Architecture & Design: Authentic, Interactive and Immersive
If there is one dominant trend in the field of hotel architecture and design, its that travelers are demanding authentic, immersive and interactive experiences. This is especially true for Millennials but Baby Boomers are seeking out meaningful experiences as well. As a result, the development of immersive travel experiences - winery resorts, culinary resorts, resorts geared toward specific sports enthusiasts - will continue to expand. Another kind of immersive experience is an urban resort one that provides all the elements you'd expect in a luxury resort, but urbanized. The urban resort hotel is designed as a staging area where the city itself provides all the amenities, and the hotel functions as a kind of sophisticated concierge service. Another trend is a re-thinking of the hotel lobby, which has evolved into an active social hub with flexible spaces for work and play, featuring cafe?s, bars, libraries, computer stations, game rooms, and more. The goal is to make this area as interactive as possible and to bring people together, making the space less of a traditional hotel lobby and more of a contemporary gathering place. This emphasis on the lobby has also had an associated effect on the size of hotel rooms they are getting smaller. Since most activities are designed to take place in the lobby, there is less time spent in rooms which justifies their smaller design. Finally, the wellness and ecology movements are also having a major impact on design. The industry is actively adopting standards so that new structures are not only environmentally sustainable, but also promote optimum health and well- being for the travelers who will inhabit them. These are a few of the current trends in the fields of hotel architecture and design that will be examined in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.