Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Gallagher

Bram Gallagher

Economist, CBRE Hotels' Americas Research

Bram Gallagher is an Economist for CBRE Hotels' Americas Research, the Americas research arm of the world's largest commercial real estate firm. He maintains performance forecasting models for 60 major U.S. hotel markets, performs consulting work for a destination marketing organization, creates tools for hotel developers, and examines the effects natural disasters have on hotel occupancy.  His background in statistical modeling and understanding of how markets operate have allowed him to reveal powerful, new insight into the future of the lodging industry.

After earning his PhD in Economics with a focus in Econometrics from the University of Georgia in 2011, Mr. Gallagher worked as a professor at Middle Tennessee State University and Berry College. Taking his expertise in microeconomic and econometric theory with him, he left the academy for a research position in the lodging industry in 2015 to better learn how economics is practiced.

His research interests are in analyzing hotel performance data combined with local and national economic data to produce actionable intelligence for the hotel manager, investor and developer. He believes that reducing and characterizing uncertainty around future outcomes spurs present decisions.

Mr. Gallagher has presented his findings on occupancy taxes to AAHOA, a paper on natural occupancy and rental adjustment at the conference of the American Real Estate Society, and thoughts on novel forecasting methods to his colleagues. He has had his research published in several CBRE reports, as well as in Hotel News Now. He has also published a generalization of the Arrow-Lind Theorem in the Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research.

Please visit http://www.cbre.com for more information.

Mr. Gallagher can be contacted at +1 404-812-5189 or bram.gallagher@cbre.com

Coming up in July 2020...

Hotel Spa: Back to Nature

As the Wellness Industry continues to expand, hotel spas are also diversifying, placing a greater emphasis on overall well-being. For some spas, this means providing clients with all-inclusive packages that include fitness classes, healthy dining, and offsite leisure activities, in addition to their core services. For example, spas near ski resorts are offering packages that include lift passes, pre-ski yoga sessions, after-ski dinners and spa treatments. Other spas are offering packages that include massages, saunas, mineral baths, hot springs, and recreational hiking and snowmobile activities. These kinds of spa offerings are also part of a "Back to Nature" movement that encourages guests to get out and experience the healing qualities of nature. One such therapy is the Japanese practice known as "forest bathing" which has become popular with spas that are near wooded areas. This practice relies on the ancient power of a forest for promoting a sense of health and well-being. Other spas are incorporating precious metals and stones into their health and beauty treatments - such as silver, gold, pearls and amber. Silver ion baths relax the body and mind, reduce fatigue, and restore energy balance. Gold keeps skin radiant and can even treat various skin diseases and infections, due to its antibacterial qualities. Amber is used to calm the nervous system and to relieve stress. Other natural products and therapies that are increasingly in demand include sound therapy, cryotherapy, infra-red saunas, and even CBD oil, which is being used in massages, facials and foot scrubs, providing a new form of stress relief. The July issue of the Hotel Business Review will document these trends and other new developments, and report on how some hotel spas are integrating them into their operations.