Editorial Board   

Mr. Thilenius

Jackson Thilenius

Principal, Retail Design Collaborative

Jackson Thilenius is a Principal at Retail Design Collaborative. After successfully running his own Architectural practice for over 14 years, he joined Retail Design Collaborative (RDC) to help further develop the firmís interior design studio.

Mr. Thilenius brings with him a diversity of thought leadership and 25 years of industry experience. A seasoned professional, he has paired his fields of expertise and core values to reflect RDCís goals Ė including a strong background in design, technical know-how, professionalism and an aptitude for developing long-term relationships with his clients. His philosophy is that each project is as unique as the personalities behind them, and he enjoys the complex exploration of client goals as they relate to design.

With each project, Mr. Thilenius works closely with clients to help shape their visions into reality, reflecting a genuine dedication to their lasting success.

Mr. Thilenius received his Master of Architecture from the Georgia Institute of Technology, and is a member of the American Institute of Architects (AIA). Bringing over two decades of experience, Mr. Thilenius has led the design of hundreds of local and international projects including locations in Hong Kong, China and Europe. Also an accomplished artist, his oil paintings have been shown in galleries from LA to NYC.

Please visit http://www.rdcollaborative.com for more information.

Mr. Thilenius can be contacted at 562-628-8000 or jackson.thilenius@rdcollaborative.com

Coming up in April 2018...

Guest Service: Empowering People

Excellent customer service is vitally important in all businesses but it is especially important for hotels where customer service is the lifeblood of the business. Outstanding customer service is essential in creating new customers, retaining existing customers, and cultivating referrals for future customers. Employees who meet and exceed guest expectations are critical to a hotel's success, and it begins with the hiring process. It is imperative for HR personnel to screen for and hire people who inherently possess customer-friendly traits - empathy, warmth and conscientiousness - which allow them to serve guests naturally and authentically. Trait-based hiring means considering more than just a candidate's technical skills and background; it means looking for and selecting employees who naturally desire to take care of people, who derive satisfaction and pleasure from fulfilling guests' needs, and who don't consider customer service to be a chore. Without the presence of these specific traits and attributes, it is difficult for an employee to provide genuine hospitality. Once that kind of employee has been hired, it is necessary to empower them. Some forward-thinking hotels empower their employees to proactively fix customer problems without having to wait for management approval. This employee empowerment—the permission to be creative, and even having the authority to spend money on a customer's behalf - is a resourceful way to resolve guest problems quickly and efficiently. When management places their faith in an employee's good judgment, it inspires a sense of trust and provides a sense of higher purpose beyond a simple paycheck. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.