Editorial Board   

Ms. Hyde

Felicia Hyde

Principal & Lifestyle Studio Director, H. Hendy Associates

As Design Director of the Lifestyle Studio at H. Hendy Associates, Felicia Hyde brings 33 years of in-depth interior architecture experience to her client engagements. She is an award-winning interior architect, having won the prestigious CoreNet Global REmmy Award for her work on the Goodman Birtcher headquarters in Irvine, Calif., as well as top honors in the IIDA Calibre Award category of Leisure and Entertainment for the ICIS Apartment Homes in Glendale, Calif.

Ms. Hyde is passionate about designing and creating memorable spaces that are indicative of her clients' vision and brand.

Acknowledged by industry leaders and an honoree of multiple awards and recognition for her designs, Ms. Hyde has spent the past decade focusing on the ever-evolving multifamily world, applying her deep-rooted experience in corporate and residential interior design to create solutions that are stimulating and deliver on clients' business objectives. She draws inspiration from style trends not only in architecture but in fashion, nature and through her travels.

Prior to H. Hendy Associates, Ms. Hyde served as senior designer at Gensler, Carrier Johnson +CULTURE, HOK, DSR Design, Inc. and Ridgway Associates. Hyde graduated from Woodbury University with a Bachelor of Science in Interior Design and a minor in Business. She also earned an Associate of Arts degree in General Education and Fine Art from Pasadena City College.

Ms. Hyde's published work has been featured in leading publications within the interior architect and design industry, including Interiors Magazine, ASU, Corporate Interiors, Interior Design Magazine, Floor Covering Weekly, Contract Magazine and Multi-Housing News.

Please visit http://www.hhendy.com for more information.

Ms. Hyde can be contacted at +1 949-851-3080 or fhyde@hhendy.com

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.