Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Skinker

Rick Skinker

Managing Director & Co-Founder, Indoor Water Conservation

Rick Skinker has a Master's degree in Finance from the University of Southern California and has obtained several certifications related to corporate restructuring. During a successful career as a turnaround consultant, he travelled continuously on a weekly basis for more than 25 years, staying in hotels throughout the US, Mexico and Canada. Using showers and sinks in different properties in different cities for that amount of time gave him an appreciation for good flows and bad flows in all categories of hotels.

In 2013, he had the opportunity to become an equity partner in a firm that had a patent on a device that controlled the flow of water in showers and sinks. He dove into understanding the market for these products and began to further develop the methodology used at the time to fit these devices in different applications. In 2015, together with Ken Leddon, they started Indoor Water Conservation. They developed technology that evolved into understanding what causes unbalanced flows in showers and sinks and developed a process to balance them. By working with customers before, during and after the installation of Flow Limiting technology, they have created the most advanced understanding of balanced flows and their benefits, both to hotels and their guests.

Mr. Skinker is passionate about Water Conservation and the continuous development of flow limiting technology and its impact on reducing and controlling costs while improving guest satisfaction. He lives with his wife, Elaine in San Diego and has four children and six grandchildren.

Please visit http://www.indoorwaterconservation.com for more information.

Mr. Skinker can be contacted at +1 619-392-8961 or rskinker@indoorh2o.com

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.