Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Johnson

Mark Johnson

President, Loyalty 360 - The Loyalty Marketerís Association

Mark Johnson is President and CEO of Loyalty 360 - The Loyalty Marketerís Association (www.loyalty360.org). Loyalty 360 is the only organization that addresses the full spectrum of both customer and employee loyalty issues. An unbiased, market driven clearinghouse and think-tank for loyalty and engagement opportunities, insights, and responses, Loyalty 360 is the source business leaders trust for industry metrics, market driven research, actionable case studies, and networking opportunities. Prior to founding Loyalty 360, Mr. Johnson designed and administered loyalty, CRM and data-driven marketing communications for industry leaders such as Fifth Third Bank, Stored Value Systems and Size Technologies. A sought-after speaker and writer, Mr. Johnson is frequently called upon by media worldwide to share his expert insights into customer and employee loyalty issues. Mr. Johnson holds an undergraduate degree in from Miami University, an M.B.A. from the University of Cincinnati, and is currently pursuing a second M.B.A. in statistics from Xavier University.

Mr. Johnson can be contacted at 513-290-5147 or markjohnson@loyalty360.org

Coming up in April 2018...

Guest Service: Empowering People

Excellent customer service is vitally important in all businesses but it is especially important for hotels where customer service is the lifeblood of the business. Outstanding customer service is essential in creating new customers, retaining existing customers, and cultivating referrals for future customers. Employees who meet and exceed guest expectations are critical to a hotel's success, and it begins with the hiring process. It is imperative for HR personnel to screen for and hire people who inherently possess customer-friendly traits - empathy, warmth and conscientiousness - which allow them to serve guests naturally and authentically. Trait-based hiring means considering more than just a candidate's technical skills and background; it means looking for and selecting employees who naturally desire to take care of people, who derive satisfaction and pleasure from fulfilling guests' needs, and who don't consider customer service to be a chore. Without the presence of these specific traits and attributes, it is difficult for an employee to provide genuine hospitality. Once that kind of employee has been hired, it is necessary to empower them. Some forward-thinking hotels empower their employees to proactively fix customer problems without having to wait for management approval. This employee empowerment—the permission to be creative, and even having the authority to spend money on a customer's behalf - is a resourceful way to resolve guest problems quickly and efficiently. When management places their faith in an employee's good judgment, it inspires a sense of trust and provides a sense of higher purpose beyond a simple paycheck. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.