Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Bowen

John T. Bowen

Dean & Barron Hilton Distinguished Chair at the Conrad N. Hilton College, University of Houston

John Bowen is Dean of the Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management. He has presented marketing courses and seminars in Asia, Australia, Central America, Europe, Mexico and South America, and has published over 100 articles on marketing. He is also the North American Research Director for World Wide Hospitality Trends. Dr. Bowen is a coauthor of Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism, the leading hospitality marketing textbook in the world. Currently, it is published in nine languages. He is also the coauthor of Restaurant Marketing for Owners and Managers. A recipient of numerous awards for both his teaching and research, Dr. Bowen is a three-time recipient of CHRIE's Wiley Research Award, formerly the Van Nostrand Reinhold Research Award, which recognizes lifetime research achievements in the hospitality field. His research focus is on customer service, customer loyalty and electronic distributing systems for service industries. Dean Bowen's industry experience is in the area of food and beverage. He has worked in hotels, freestanding restaurants and as the corporate food and beverage manager of a hotel management company. For 15 years, he owned and operated Theodore Zinck's in downtown Dallas. A dedicated educator, Dr. Bowen started his teaching career in 1978 at Del Mar College's Restaurant Management Program. He was an assistant professor at the Hilton College from 1980 to 1990. In 1990, he left to teach at Bond University in Australia and returned to the United States in 1993 to take a position at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He returned to the Hilton College as Dean in 2003. Expertise & Research Interests Customer Satisfaction Customer Loyalty New Product Development Casino Player Behavior Selected Publications - Kotler, P., Bowen, J. & Makens, J. (2006). Marketing for Hospitality and Tourism (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, N. J.: Prentice Hall. Published in eight languages. - Shock, P. Bowen, J. & Stefanelli, J. (2004). Restaurant Marketing for Owners and Managers. New York: John Wiley and Sons. Published in three languages. - Mayer, K. Bowen, J. & Moulton, M. (2003). A Proposed Model of Service Descriptors, The Journal of Services Marketing, 17(6), 621-639. - Sparks, B., Bowen, J. & Klag, S. (2003). Restaurants and the Tourist Market. International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, 15(1), 6-13. - Bowen, J. & Ford, R. (2002). Does Having a Thing Make a Difference? Journal of Management, 28(3), 447-469. - Lucas, A. & Bowen, J. (2002). An Analysis of Slot Promotions. International Journal of Hospitality Management, 21(2), 189-202. Received the W. Bradford Wiley Research Award for Superior Research in Hospitality and Tourism. - Su, W. & Bowen, J. (2001). Restaurant Customer Complaint Behavior. Journal of Restaurant and Foodservice Marketing, 4(2), 35-65. - Bowen, J. & Shaing-Lih C. (2001). The Relationship Between Customer Loyalty and Customer Satisfaction. International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, 13(5), 13-17. Awarded Best Article for 2001. - Nelson, K. & Bowen, J. (2000). Employee uniforms: Their impact on customer and employee satisfaction. Cornell Hotel and Restaurant Quarterly, 41(2), 86-95. - Bowen, J., & Shoemaker, S. (2003). Loyalty: A Strategic Commitment. Cornell Hotel & Restaurant Administration Quarterly, 44(5/6), 31-46. Awarded the W. Bradford Wiley Research Award for Superior Research in Hospitality and Tourism. - Makens, J. & Bowen, J. (1996). Increasing Profits Through Product Merchandising. The Cornell Hotel and Restaurant Quarterly, 37(1), 72-79.

Mr. Bowen can be contacted at 713-743-0209 or jtbowen@Central.UH.EDU

Coming up in April 2018...

Guest Service: Empowering People

Excellent customer service is vitally important in all businesses but it is especially important for hotels where customer service is the lifeblood of the business. Outstanding customer service is essential in creating new customers, retaining existing customers, and cultivating referrals for future customers. Employees who meet and exceed guest expectations are critical to a hotel's success, and it begins with the hiring process. It is imperative for HR personnel to screen for and hire people who inherently possess customer-friendly traits - empathy, warmth and conscientiousness - which allow them to serve guests naturally and authentically. Trait-based hiring means considering more than just a candidate's technical skills and background; it means looking for and selecting employees who naturally desire to take care of people, who derive satisfaction and pleasure from fulfilling guests' needs, and who don't consider customer service to be a chore. Without the presence of these specific traits and attributes, it is difficult for an employee to provide genuine hospitality. Once that kind of employee has been hired, it is necessary to empower them. Some forward-thinking hotels empower their employees to proactively fix customer problems without having to wait for management approval. This employee empowerment—the permission to be creative, and even having the authority to spend money on a customer's behalf - is a resourceful way to resolve guest problems quickly and efficiently. When management places their faith in an employee's good judgment, it inspires a sense of trust and provides a sense of higher purpose beyond a simple paycheck. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.