Editorial Board   

Ms. Pohlid

Kathleen Pohlid

Founder & Managing Member, Pohlid, PLLC

Kathleen Pohlid is the founder and managing member of the law firm of Pohlid, PLLC in the Nashville, Tennessee area. She advises business clients in matters including employment, occupational safety and health, Americans with Disabilities Act (accommodation & discrimination) and regulatory compliance. Her goal is to enable clients to comply with the myriad of state and federal laws to succeed in their business, mindful of the challenges facing businesses and the importance of cost effectiveness. She has advised and represented businesses in a variety of industries including restaurants, hotels, and other entities in the tourism and hospitality industries. Ms. Pohlid has over 20 years of combined federal government and private sector experience in employment law and litigation. She has represented clients in various industries including construction, restaurant and hotel services, entertainment, media and publication, transportation, fuel/energy services, retail, manufacturing, and other sectors of business. Ms. Pohlid holds an AV® rating from Martindale-Hubbell (highest for professional competency and ethics), a B.S. degree from the U.S. Naval Academy and a J.D. from Samford University. Following law school, Ms. Pohlid served a federal clerkship to the Honorable T. Michael Putnam, U.S. Magistrate, Northern District of Alabama. She formerly represented the Secretary of Labor as a trial attorney for twelve years with the Office of the Solicitor, U.S. Department of Labor before going into private practice representing business clients in various industries. Ms. Pohlid is a member of the American Bar Association, the American Society of Safety Engineers, and the Associated General Contractors of America. She regularly writes and speaks professionally on employment law and regulatory compliance matters. In 2010, Ms. Pohlid retired from the U.S. Marine Corps as a Colonel, having served two combat deployments. Her military duty assignments include duty in Japan, Djibouti, Africa and Iraq. Ms. Pohlid is also a former columnist for The Birmingham News for which she wrote a weekly column for 15 years profiling volunteers and their contributions to the community. She is an avid traveler and has visited all 50 states and six continents.

Please visit http://www.pohlid.com for more information.

Ms. Pohlid can be contacted at 615-369-0810 or kpohlid@pohlid.com

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.