Editorial Board   Guest Author

Ms. Borgman

Peggy Borgman

President, Preston Wynne, Inc.

Peggy Wynne Borgman is CEO of Preston Wynne, Inc., which was founded in 1984 and currently operates two spa facilities, one a luxury day spa and the other a hotel spa, in the San Francisco Bay Area. Today the company employs 60+ bodyworkers, estheticians, nail technicians, spa concierges, housekeepers, and managers. Ms. Borgman is also principal consultant and seminar leader for Preston Wynne's business-to-business division, which has offered consulting and training services to the spa industry since 1994. Clients of the B2B division have included Hyatt Hotels, Four Seasons, Ritz Carlton, Shangri-La, the Peninsula Group, Treasure Island Resort and Casino, Glen Ivy Hot Springs Spas, East West College of the Healing Arts and Gold's Gym. The author of the consumer title Four Seasons of Inner and Outer Beauty: Spa Rituals for Well-Being, from Random House, Ms. Borgman is also a frequent contributor to spa industry magazines and a highly-rated speaker for trade events such as ISPA, IESC and the American Spa Expo. Her commentary on the spa industry has been featured in USA Today and Time magazine. She is a member of the board of directors for Next Door Solutions, a domestic violence agency in Santa Clara, California, where she works to put the healing and fundraising resources of spas to work in aiding victims of domestic abuse.

Ms. Borgman can be contacted at (408) 741-1750 ext 30 or pwb@prestonwynne.com

Coming up in April 2018...

Guest Service: Empowering People

Excellent customer service is vitally important in all businesses but it is especially important for hotels where customer service is the lifeblood of the business. Outstanding customer service is essential in creating new customers, retaining existing customers, and cultivating referrals for future customers. Employees who meet and exceed guest expectations are critical to a hotel's success, and it begins with the hiring process. It is imperative for HR personnel to screen for and hire people who inherently possess customer-friendly traits - empathy, warmth and conscientiousness - which allow them to serve guests naturally and authentically. Trait-based hiring means considering more than just a candidate's technical skills and background; it means looking for and selecting employees who naturally desire to take care of people, who derive satisfaction and pleasure from fulfilling guests' needs, and who don't consider customer service to be a chore. Without the presence of these specific traits and attributes, it is difficult for an employee to provide genuine hospitality. Once that kind of employee has been hired, it is necessary to empower them. Some forward-thinking hotels empower their employees to proactively fix customer problems without having to wait for management approval. This employee empowerment—the permission to be creative, and even having the authority to spend money on a customer's behalf - is a resourceful way to resolve guest problems quickly and efficiently. When management places their faith in an employee's good judgment, it inspires a sense of trust and provides a sense of higher purpose beyond a simple paycheck. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.