Editorial Board   Guest Author

Dr. Kimes

Sheryl E. Kimes

Professor of Operations Management, Cornell University School of Hotel Administration

Sheryl E. Kimes is a professor of operations management in the School of Hotel Administration at Cornell University. From 2005-2006, she served as interim dean of the Hotel School and from 2001- 2005, she served as the school’s director of graduate studies. She teaches courses in restaurant revenue management, advanced revenue management, service operations management and advanced hospitality operations management. Dr. Kimes's research interests include revenue management and forecasting in the restaurant, hotel, and golf industries. She was given the Lifetime Achievement Award by the College of Service Operations of the Production and Operations Management Society and was honored with the Industry Relevance Award by the Cornell University Center for Hospitality Research in 2010. Dr. Kimes was awarded the La Quinta Research Fellowship, and has received 20 university research grants. She has been listed in Who’s Who and has been named as the Cornell University School of Hotel Administration Graduate Teacher of the Year three times. Dr. Kimes has published more than 50 articles in leading journals such as Interfaces, Journal of Operations Management, Journal of Service Research, Journal of Operational Research, and the Cornell Hotel and Restaurant Administration Quarterly. She is the author/co-author of over 30 national and international conference papers and has been an invited speaker at numerous international conferences. Professor Kimes serves as a consultant to many business enterprises around the world. Her work is focused primarily on maximizing revenue management practices. She has served the hospitality industry as a consultant to many business enterprises around the world, including Hyatt Hotels and Resorts, Walt Disney World Resorts, Yum Brands, The Peninsula Group, Aramark, Starwood Asia-Pacific and Troon Golf. Professor Kimes earned her doctorate in operations management in 1987 from the University of Texas at Austin. She also holds an M.B.A. from New Mexico State University; an M.A.P.A. from the University of Virginia; and an A.B. from the University of Missouri.

Dr. Kimes can be contacted at 607.255.3692 or sek6@cornell.edu

Coming up in April 2018...

Guest Service: Empowering People

Excellent customer service is vitally important in all businesses but it is especially important for hotels where customer service is the lifeblood of the business. Outstanding customer service is essential in creating new customers, retaining existing customers, and cultivating referrals for future customers. Employees who meet and exceed guest expectations are critical to a hotel's success, and it begins with the hiring process. It is imperative for HR personnel to screen for and hire people who inherently possess customer-friendly traits - empathy, warmth and conscientiousness - which allow them to serve guests naturally and authentically. Trait-based hiring means considering more than just a candidate's technical skills and background; it means looking for and selecting employees who naturally desire to take care of people, who derive satisfaction and pleasure from fulfilling guests' needs, and who don't consider customer service to be a chore. Without the presence of these specific traits and attributes, it is difficult for an employee to provide genuine hospitality. Once that kind of employee has been hired, it is necessary to empower them. Some forward-thinking hotels empower their employees to proactively fix customer problems without having to wait for management approval. This employee empowerment—the permission to be creative, and even having the authority to spend money on a customer's behalf - is a resourceful way to resolve guest problems quickly and efficiently. When management places their faith in an employee's good judgment, it inspires a sense of trust and provides a sense of higher purpose beyond a simple paycheck. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.