Editorial Board   

Ms. Dolecki

Leigh Anne Dolecki

President, The Northern California Concierge Association

Leigh Anne Dolecki joined the hospitality industry after a 20 year career in the world of theatre production. Since becoming a concierge in 2000 she has served as vice president of the Northern California Concierge Association; at the end of 2007 she completed her two year term as president of the NCCA. She represented a membership of over 160 concierges throughout the Bay Area as far south as Monterey and Carmel, and as far north as Healdsburg. As president, Ms. Dolecki provided educational opportunities for the members by planning meetings and events, as well as building relationships with service providers throughout northern California, keeping NCCA members on the forefront of guest services. She remains on the current board of directors as past president. As a member of Les Clefs d'Or USA, Ms. Dolecki most recently attended the Panamerican Congress in Vancouver, British Columbia, and the International Congress in Copenhagen Denmark, as well as the National Congress in New York City. She has made numerous presentations on the Northern California Concierge Association's response to concierge outsourcing. Ms. Dolecki provides guest service as chef concierge at Campton Place, a Taj Hotel. Located in downtown San Francisco, just off Union Square, the 110-room luxury boutique hotel is the third Taj Hotel in the United States along with The Pierre and the Taj Boston; it is also a member of The Leading Small Hotels of the World. Ms. Dolecki continues her work as the lead for food in the San Francisco mayor's outreach program for the homeless, Project Homeless Connect.

Ms. Dolecki can be contacted at 415-955-5552 or ladolecki@gmail.com

Coming up in July 2020...

Hotel Spa: Back to Nature

As the Wellness Industry continues to expand, hotel spas are also diversifying, placing a greater emphasis on overall well-being. For some spas, this means providing clients with all-inclusive packages that include fitness classes, healthy dining, and offsite leisure activities, in addition to their core services. For example, spas near ski resorts are offering packages that include lift passes, pre-ski yoga sessions, after-ski dinners and spa treatments. Other spas are offering packages that include massages, saunas, mineral baths, hot springs, and recreational hiking and snowmobile activities. These kinds of spa offerings are also part of a "Back to Nature" movement that encourages guests to get out and experience the healing qualities of nature. One such therapy is the Japanese practice known as "forest bathing" which has become popular with spas that are near wooded areas. This practice relies on the ancient power of a forest for promoting a sense of health and well-being. Other spas are incorporating precious metals and stones into their health and beauty treatments - such as silver, gold, pearls and amber. Silver ion baths relax the body and mind, reduce fatigue, and restore energy balance. Gold keeps skin radiant and can even treat various skin diseases and infections, due to its antibacterial qualities. Amber is used to calm the nervous system and to relieve stress. Other natural products and therapies that are increasingly in demand include sound therapy, cryotherapy, infra-red saunas, and even CBD oil, which is being used in massages, facials and foot scrubs, providing a new form of stress relief. The July issue of the Hotel Business Review will document these trends and other new developments, and report on how some hotel spas are integrating them into their operations.