Editorial Board   

Mr. Brown

Dan Brown

Partner, Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP

Daniel Brown is a Partner in the Antitrust practice group and Hospitality group at Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP. He is located in the firm's New York office. Mr. Brown regularly counsels clients in high stakes, complex, commercial litigations and arbitrations in the areas of contract, hospitality, antitrust, fraud, fiduciary duties, banking, employment, and discrimination. Mr. Brown has frequently appeared in federal and state courts in New York and in other jurisdictions pro hac vice, and has successfully argued cases before the Appellate Division, First Department, and Second Circuit Court of Appeals. He successfully argued an appeal before the Second Circuit Court of Appeals in Blue Tree Hotels Investment Canada) Ltd. v. Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc., 369 F.3d 212 (2d Cir. 2004), which resulted in the dismissal of alleged antitrust violations against the defendants arising from purported violations of the Robinson-Patman Act. Mr. Brown was lead counsel for Plaintiffs in Hall v. New York Roadrunners Club, 99-Civ.-4122 (E.D.N.Y.), a lawsuit brought under the Americans With Disabilities Act in connection with the running of the New York City Marathon. The historic settlement of that lawsuit included equal treatment for wheelchair athletes in the largest spectator event in the world. Mr. Brown has made significant contributions to cases that have been reported in the New York Law Journal, New York Times, and Wall Street Journal. Mr. Brown has also appeared on CNN, NBC and Court TV. Mr. Brown has presented at hospitality and other Continuing Legal Education conferences. He was previously a partner in the law firm of Bickel & Brewer.

Mr. Brown can be contacted at 212-332-3879 or dlbrown@sheppardmullin.com

Coming up in April 2018...

Guest Service: Empowering People

Excellent customer service is vitally important in all businesses but it is especially important for hotels where customer service is the lifeblood of the business. Outstanding customer service is essential in creating new customers, retaining existing customers, and cultivating referrals for future customers. Employees who meet and exceed guest expectations are critical to a hotel's success, and it begins with the hiring process. It is imperative for HR personnel to screen for and hire people who inherently possess customer-friendly traits - empathy, warmth and conscientiousness - which allow them to serve guests naturally and authentically. Trait-based hiring means considering more than just a candidate's technical skills and background; it means looking for and selecting employees who naturally desire to take care of people, who derive satisfaction and pleasure from fulfilling guests' needs, and who don't consider customer service to be a chore. Without the presence of these specific traits and attributes, it is difficult for an employee to provide genuine hospitality. Once that kind of employee has been hired, it is necessary to empower them. Some forward-thinking hotels empower their employees to proactively fix customer problems without having to wait for management approval. This employee empowerment—the permission to be creative, and even having the authority to spend money on a customer's behalf - is a resourceful way to resolve guest problems quickly and efficiently. When management places their faith in an employee's good judgment, it inspires a sense of trust and provides a sense of higher purpose beyond a simple paycheck. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.