Editorial Board   

Mr. Brown

Dan Brown

Partner, Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP

Daniel Brown is a Partner in the Antitrust practice group and Hospitality group at Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP. He is located in the firm's New York office. Mr. Brown regularly counsels clients in high stakes, complex, commercial litigations and arbitrations in the areas of contract, hospitality, antitrust, fraud, fiduciary duties, banking, employment, and discrimination. Mr. Brown has frequently appeared in federal and state courts in New York and in other jurisdictions pro hac vice, and has successfully argued cases before the Appellate Division, First Department, and Second Circuit Court of Appeals. He successfully argued an appeal before the Second Circuit Court of Appeals in Blue Tree Hotels Investment Canada) Ltd. v. Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc., 369 F.3d 212 (2d Cir. 2004), which resulted in the dismissal of alleged antitrust violations against the defendants arising from purported violations of the Robinson-Patman Act. Mr. Brown was lead counsel for Plaintiffs in Hall v. New York Roadrunners Club, 99-Civ.-4122 (E.D.N.Y.), a lawsuit brought under the Americans With Disabilities Act in connection with the running of the New York City Marathon. The historic settlement of that lawsuit included equal treatment for wheelchair athletes in the largest spectator event in the world. Mr. Brown has made significant contributions to cases that have been reported in the New York Law Journal, New York Times, and Wall Street Journal. Mr. Brown has also appeared on CNN, NBC and Court TV. Mr. Brown has presented at hospitality and other Continuing Legal Education conferences. He was previously a partner in the law firm of Bickel & Brewer.

Mr. Brown can be contacted at 212-332-3879 or dlbrown@sheppardmullin.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.