Editorial Board   

Ms. Bulls Dixon

Gayle Bulls Dixon

Owner/Founder, Breathe Spa Management Company

As a former Fortune 100 executive, leadership consultant and entrepreneur, Gayle Bulls Dixon's business acumen and wellness philosophy find an uncommon melding in the Breathe Spa concept, which she created in 2002. Already a partner in Dixon Entities, which owns and manages real estate investments including the Daufuskie Island Resort & Breathe Spa off the coast of Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, Ms. Dixon was perplexed to find a lack of qualified spa management companies that satisfied her requirements for service, partnership, vision and profitability. Shortly after opening the Breathe Spa at the exclusive Daufuskie Island Resort, Ms. Dixon began receiving requests for spa management assistance from other resort owners. "It became apparent that there was significant interest in the Breathe Spa concept, as well as in a spa management company that focused on both impeccable service and profitability," she says. "I created Breathe Spa Management Company (BSMC), which is a full-service destination spa and spa management company because the market led me to do so. It is successful because I have both the financial and management background to lead the team that I have assembled, consisting of great leaders with direct experience managing upscale spas." Ms. Dixon's professional background includes executive level positions in the U.S., London and Venezuela with international corporations like AT&T, IBM and Qwest. She also founded Learning, Inc., a consulting firm specializing in leadership and corporate reorganizations, in 1996. In addition to the executive roles in BSMC and Dixon Entities, Ms. Dixon presents to and is involved with business and women's organizations, and she recently spoke at the 2004 China-U.S. Women's Leadership Conference in China. She is anticipating the release of her first book in 2005, which examines how women business leaders can best focus their feminine strengths to their advantage in a male-dominated business climate. She also has a television pilot in the works which explores various aspects of increased spirituality. Ms. Dixon received a bachelor's degree in management from California Coast University; a mini-MBA from Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania, and is a graduate of the Entrepreneur's Program of Southern Methodist University in Dallas. She resides with her husband Bill in the San Francisco Bay area.

Ms. Bulls Dixon can be contacted at 415-789-5224 or gayledixon@dixonentities.com

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.