Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Sullivan

Michael Sullivan

Shareholder, Greenberg Traurig

Michael Sullivan is the co-Managing Shareholder of the Orlando office of Greenberg Traurig and is the co-Chair of Greenberg Traurig's Hotels, Resorts and Clubs Practice Group. Mr. Sullivan specializes in the representation of real estate developers, national hotel chains, lenders and owners in the purchase, development, finance, leasing, operation, management and licensing of hotels, condo-hotels, and resorts. He has extensive experience in the negotiation of both public and private hotel management contracts and has negotiated public/private ventures on behalf of hotel companies and owners with local governments and publicly owned convention centers. He has extensive experience in hotel insolvency proceedings including loan work-outs, foreclosures and bankruptcies. In addition, Mr. Sullivan's practice includes development of complex mixed use real estate developments and the purchase, sale and financing of retirement communities, medical office buildings and senior living communities. Mr. Sullivan received his Juris Doctor degree, with Honors, from the University of Connecticut School of Law in 1984 and his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1980 from Yale University.

Mr. Sullivan can be contacted at 407-420-1000 or sullivanm@gtlaw.com

Coming up in March 2021...

Hotel Human Resources: Pending Labor Shortage

The immense devastation suffered in the hotel industry last year has compounded a problem that human resource professionals will face once the market starts to recover in 2021 - a pending labor shortage. Though some hotels have done their best to retain employees or to ease the suffering caused by mass furloughs, staff reduction was inevitable and many of those employees may not be available to return when guest traffic picks up. Consequently, hotels will once again be competing to find and retain qualified talent to staff their operations. Naturally, companies will have to review their wage and benefits packages in order to remain competitive. They might also wholeheartedly embrace the work-from-home trend for some corporate positions. In addition, human resource professionals will also have to definitively convince frontline employees that their  hotels are safe to work in. The March Hotel Business Review will explore what some HR professionals are doing to address these and other employment issues in their respective departments.