Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Houran

James Houran

Managing Director, AETHOS Consulting Group

"Dr. Jim" Houran, Ph.D., Managing Director of AETHOS Consulting Group, is a 25-year veteran in applied psychological research and a published expert on peak performance, online testing and interpersonal and organizational compatibility.

Dr. Houran has authored over 150 articles, and his award-winning work has been profiled by a myriad of media outlets and programs including the Discovery Channel, A&E, BBC, National Geographic, NBC's Today Show, USA Today, New Scientist, Psychology Today and Forbes.com.

Dr. Houran serves as adjunct faculty at the Laboratory for Statistics and Computation, ISLA - Instituto Politecnico de Gestão e Tecnologia (Lisbon, Portugal), an editorial board member for the APA peer-reviewed journal, Psychology of Consciousness: Theory, Research and Practice, and as an editorial board member for the peer-reviewed journal, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly.

AETHOS Consulting Group is a global hospitality advisory firm serving the hotel, restaurant, casino, cruise line, club and travel technology sectors. Core competencies include executive search, compensation consulting, organizational development and psychometric assessments. Through strategic joint-ventures, AETHOS further assists its clients in gaining access to expert advice and specialist services in the area of logistics and supply chain management as well as insurance solutions.

Many people over the years have told Dr. Houran that he is best described as an unconventional researcher and practitioner who's clearly passionate about bringing real-world psychology to the everyday personal and professional lives of clients. This is possible because of his eclectic and generalist background in the social sciences, which gives him a comprehensive perspective about imagination, cognition, personality and behavior.

For Dr. Houran, nothing compares to the satisfaction of working on projects in which the latest psychological theories help to produce unprecedented awareness and positive outcomes. The fluid and demanding industry of hospitality is ultimately built on people and relationships. Psychology has so much to say about the drivers of professional development, team dynamics, organizational performance and the guest experience.

Dr. Houran is in his element when consulting with leaders and their teams on these strategic issues. But psychology doesn't define his entire identity; he stays personally grounded through his family and enjoying the natural sciences, history, anthropology and the arts. It's fun and rewarding being unconventional!

Please visit http://www.aethoscg.com for more information.

Mr. Houran can be contacted at +1 817-542-7602 or jhouran@aethoscg.com

Coming up in November 2020...

Hotel Design: Home Away From Home

With the rise of the sharing economy and the peer-to-peer marketplace for lodging options, hoteliers are re-thinking the look, feel and appeal of their locations. There is an emphasis on re-creating a feeling of homeyness - a comfortable, cozy and inviting space that feels like home. 'This is accomplished through the careful selection of furniture design, paint colors, lighting design, artwork, bathroom fixtures and textile accessories. In addition, some hotels are providing their guests with upscale amenities, such as a book and movie library, home-style kitchenettes, a coffee machine with locally-sourced beans and tea, or even a batch of fresh-baked cookies. Similarly, there is a growing design trend based on the concept of place-making. Travelers are searching for experiences that are unique and authentic to the locale in which they find themselves, and so hotel designers are integrating a sense of place into their work. This is partially achieved by incorporating traditional artisanal crafts and other local artwork into hotel rooms and communal spaces. Another design trend includes the creation of full-service, co-working environments within the hotel. Guests don't like to stay alone in their room when they need to work, so now they can go downstairs to the lobby-or up to the roof-to work among others. These areas encourage guests - and non-guests alike - to stay as long as they like and to partake of hotel amenities. Finally, recognizing the importance of the Wellness Movement, some designers are exploring how room design can increase the likelihood of deep and restorative sleep. Creating dark and quiet spaces, blocking excessive light, providing guests with a selection of different kinds of pillows, and the ability to control room temperature, are a few of the best practices in this area. These are some of the architecture and design topics that will be covered in the November issue of the Hotel Business Review.