Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Rahe

Eric Rahe

Principal, BLT Architects

Eric M. Rahe is a principal and member of the executive leadership team at BLT Architects. Ericís thirty years of practice span the hospitality, residential, retail, commercial office, and educational sectors with a special focus on large-scale hospitality and resort projects. Mr. Rahe has led projects at more than 17 hotels, ranging from limited service hotels to large-scale, multi-billion dollar resorts. Notable projects include The Marriott Center City Philadelphia, Lowes Philadelphia, Echelon Resort in Las Vegas, The Water Club and Borgata in Atlantic City, and Revel Resort in Atlantic City. Revel is a 6.3 million square foot beachfront destination in Atlantic City, New Jersey featuring 1,898 guest rooms, numerous culinary and lifestyle experiences and 150,000 square feet of gaming space. Having developed a strong interest in how the design process influences the success of each project and a passion for clarity in design and communication, Mr. Rahe has built a reputation for his analytical approach to understanding his clientsí needs and managing large and diverse teams. Influenced by a history of extensive collaboration between the design and construction teams in his work, he is guiding the firmís process and technology initiatives in support of industry trends towards integrated project delivery. Mr. Rahe is also an avid proponent for the sustainability of environmental, capital, and human resources, an outlook shaped by his undergraduate studies in environmental design and reinforced during recent certification as a LEED AP. He earned his Bachelor of Environmental Design/Architecture from Miami University.

Mr. Rahe can be contacted at 215-563-3900 or hmt@blta.com

Coming up in April 2018...

Guest Service: Empowering People

Excellent customer service is vitally important in all businesses but it is especially important for hotels where customer service is the lifeblood of the business. Outstanding customer service is essential in creating new customers, retaining existing customers, and cultivating referrals for future customers. Employees who meet and exceed guest expectations are critical to a hotel's success, and it begins with the hiring process. It is imperative for HR personnel to screen for and hire people who inherently possess customer-friendly traits - empathy, warmth and conscientiousness - which allow them to serve guests naturally and authentically. Trait-based hiring means considering more than just a candidate's technical skills and background; it means looking for and selecting employees who naturally desire to take care of people, who derive satisfaction and pleasure from fulfilling guests' needs, and who don't consider customer service to be a chore. Without the presence of these specific traits and attributes, it is difficult for an employee to provide genuine hospitality. Once that kind of employee has been hired, it is necessary to empower them. Some forward-thinking hotels empower their employees to proactively fix customer problems without having to wait for management approval. This employee empowerment—the permission to be creative, and even having the authority to spend money on a customer's behalf - is a resourceful way to resolve guest problems quickly and efficiently. When management places their faith in an employee's good judgment, it inspires a sense of trust and provides a sense of higher purpose beyond a simple paycheck. The April issue of the Hotel Business Review will document what some leading hotels are doing to cultivate and manage guest satisfaction in their operations.