Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Rahe

Eric Rahe

Principal, BLT Architects

Eric M. Rahe is a principal and member of the executive leadership team at BLT Architects. Eric's thirty years of practice span the hospitality, residential, retail, commercial office, and educational sectors with a special focus on large-scale hospitality and resort projects. Mr. Rahe has led projects at more than 17 hotels, ranging from limited service hotels to large-scale, multi-billion dollar resorts. Notable projects include The Marriott Center City Philadelphia, Lowes Philadelphia, Echelon Resort in Las Vegas, The Water Club and Borgata in Atlantic City, and Revel Resort in Atlantic City. Revel is a 6.3 million square foot beachfront destination in Atlantic City, New Jersey featuring 1,898 guest rooms, numerous culinary and lifestyle experiences and 150,000 square feet of gaming space. Having developed a strong interest in how the design process influences the success of each project and a passion for clarity in design and communication, Mr. Rahe has built a reputation for his analytical approach to understanding his clients' needs and managing large and diverse teams. Influenced by a history of extensive collaboration between the design and construction teams in his work, he is guiding the firm's process and technology initiatives in support of industry trends towards integrated project delivery. Mr. Rahe is also an avid proponent for the sustainability of environmental, capital, and human resources, an outlook shaped by his undergraduate studies in environmental design and reinforced during recent certification as a LEED AP. He earned his Bachelor of Environmental Design/Architecture from Miami University.

Mr. Rahe can be contacted at 215-563-3900 or hmt@blta.com

Coming up in July 2020...

Hotel Spa: Back to Nature

As the Wellness Industry continues to expand, hotel spas are also diversifying, placing a greater emphasis on overall well-being. For some spas, this means providing clients with all-inclusive packages that include fitness classes, healthy dining, and offsite leisure activities, in addition to their core services. For example, spas near ski resorts are offering packages that include lift passes, pre-ski yoga sessions, after-ski dinners and spa treatments. Other spas are offering packages that include massages, saunas, mineral baths, hot springs, and recreational hiking and snowmobile activities. These kinds of spa offerings are also part of a "Back to Nature" movement that encourages guests to get out and experience the healing qualities of nature. One such therapy is the Japanese practice known as "forest bathing" which has become popular with spas that are near wooded areas. This practice relies on the ancient power of a forest for promoting a sense of health and well-being. Other spas are incorporating precious metals and stones into their health and beauty treatments - such as silver, gold, pearls and amber. Silver ion baths relax the body and mind, reduce fatigue, and restore energy balance. Gold keeps skin radiant and can even treat various skin diseases and infections, due to its antibacterial qualities. Amber is used to calm the nervous system and to relieve stress. Other natural products and therapies that are increasingly in demand include sound therapy, cryotherapy, infra-red saunas, and even CBD oil, which is being used in massages, facials and foot scrubs, providing a new form of stress relief. The July issue of the Hotel Business Review will document these trends and other new developments, and report on how some hotel spas are integrating them into their operations.