Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Wolf

C. David Wolf

Executive Chef, The Blackwell Inn & Conference Center

C. David Wolf CEC, AAC is an American Culinary Federation Certified Executive Chef for The Blackwell Inn and Conference Center, a highly respected Summit luxury hotel catering to upscale transient executive education guests and the discerning business traveler. The Blackwell Inn has been positioned number one in the city of Columbus for annual guest room occupancy year over year. Chef Wolf's interest in cooking began at age 14 where he helped to prepare traditional Italian cuisine in his grandmother's kitchen. His first restaurant position at age 16 launched his lifelong career in culinary arts. Previous to Chef Wolf's position with the Blackwell he was Executive Chef with the Global Hyatt Hotel Corporation for 23 years holding positions at the Hyatt Regency, Hyatt on Capitol Square and Hyatt's luxury brand at the Park Hyatt Philadelphia at the Bellevue, registered as a National Historic Landmark. Chef Wolf has prior restaurant positions throughout Columbus and in Cincinnati Ohio. Chef Wolf's education took place at La Varenne Ecole d'Cuisine, Paris France, The International School of Confectionery Arts, The Culinary Institute of America, St. Helena, and The Greenbrier, White Sulfur Springs, West Virginia. He is a member of The American Culinary Federation, World Association of Cooks, the James Beard Foundation and the esteemed Commanderie des Costes du Rhone. Locally, Chef Wolf holds a seat on the Columbus State Community College Advisory Board. He is the Columbus Chapter Chairman of the American Culinary Federation Apprenticeship Committee and is serving a four-year term as Vice President Columbus Chapter American Culinary Federation. March 2008 Chef Wolf received the prestigious Presidential Medallion for years of committed dedication to the American Culinary federation and training of apprentices in culinary arts. In May 2008, he participated in a-hands on continued education culinary tour of Sicily, Italy from east coast to west with a keen focus on the “slow food” movement. Upon his return was honored with the American Culinary Federation Columbus Chapter 2008 Chef of the year award. In August of 2010 Chef Wolf was inducted in the American Culinary Federations' American Academy of Chefs, a prestigious honor society, hall of fame for the peer-respected colleagues in the food service industry today. In April 2012, Chef Wolf received recognition for Chef Professionalism from the American Culinary Federation representing the Northeast Region.

Mr. Wolf can be contacted at 614-535-7803 or wolf.522@osu.edu

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.