Editorial Board   Guest Author

Mr. Johnson

Brian Johnson

Managing Director, Loews Ventana Canyon Resort

Brian Johnson is the Managing Director of the Loews Ventana Canyon Resort, the 398-room award-winning property nestled in the Santa Catalina Foothills in Tucson, Ariz. His extensive experience in the hotel industry includes serving as general manager of the Loews Portofino Bay Hotel in Orlando, Fla., and various management roles in hotels including the Regent Las Vegas, Scottsdale Princess, Resort at Squaw Creek, Sheraton Grande Torrey Pines and several of the Sheraton Hotels on Harbor Island. Johnson received a Bachelor's Degree in Hotel and Restaurant Administration from the University of Nevada in Las Vegas, and an MBA in Business Administration with an Emphasis in Marketing from National University in San Diego, California. He currently serves as the Arizona representative for the American Hotel and Lodging Association (AHLA), and is a member of the Southern Arizona Leadership Council (SALC). He also is an executive board member of both the Arizona Lodging and Tourism Association (AzLTA) and the Southern Arizona Lodging and Resort Association (SALARA). Amongst his many accolades are Hotel of the Year 2009 and General Manager of the Year 2008 from Loews Hotels and Resorts, Father of the Year from the Tucson Father's Day Council in 2007, and Hotelier of the Year 2006 award from the Arizona Hotel and Lodging Association.

Mr. Johnson can be contacted at 520-529-7900 or bjohnson@loewshotels.com

Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.