Spa Treatment Trends: Cues from the Food Industry

By Jane Segerberg Founder & President, Segerberg Spa Consulting, LLC | January 15, 2012

As we continue to batten down the hatches, nostalgic for good ol' economic stability and at the same time, anticipating the passing of the storm, it is perfect timing to plan for positioning at the forefront of the market when the storm passes.

Looking forward, we will examine spa treatment trends that have legs and are not just passing fads. Rising trends that have longevity and are selected for their synergy with the ambiance and philosophy of your property offer a distinctive match that strengths the appeal of your property and market.

It is fortunate that trend comparisons can be related to Food and Beverage trends since hoteliers understand F&B very while, while spas seem to be more difficult for most managers to master. By comparing spas and trends to F&B hopefully a comfort level is achieved and results in guiding your spa to higher success. From the menu combination and presentation all the way through the level of the wait staff's understanding of the menu, selling the menu and servicing the guest along with the quality of the chef's preparation and presentation of the food; there are many similarities and trends to be considered for the Spa Industry.

This article will list the trend cues that spas can adopt from the food industry including close similarities. Take note that we will go beyond treatment cues to management and demonstrate how the Spa Industry is losing net profit along with loyal guests due to a significant point of departure from one very important cue. This cue is saved for the last - - skip to the end if you like, but hopefully go back to review the other cues.

Spas and F&B - Easy similarities to adapt

Cue #1 - Eating is a necessity: Dining is not

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Coming up in February 2018...

Social Media: Engagement is Key

There are currently 2.3 billion active users of social media networks and savvy hotel operators have incorporated social media into their marketing mix. There are a few Goliath channels on which one must have a presence (Facebook & Twitter) but there are also several newer upstart channels (Instagram, Snapchat &WeChat, for example) that merit consideration. With its 1.86 billion users, Facebook is a dominant platform where operators can drive brand awareness, facilitate bookings, offer incentives and collect sought-after reviews. Twitter's 284 million users generate 500 million tweets per day, and operators can use its platform for lead generation, building loyalty, and guest interaction. Instagram was originally a small photo-sharing site but it has blown up into a massive photo and video channel. The site can be used to post photos of the hotel property, as well as creating Instagram Stories - personal videos that disappear from the channel after 24 hours. In this regard, Instagram and Snapchat are now in direct competition. WeChat is a Chinese company whose aim is to be the App for Everything - instant messaging, social media, shopping and payment services - all in a single platform. In addition to these channels, blogging continues to be a popular method to establish leadership, enhance reputations, and engage with customers in a direct and personal way. The key to effective use of all social media is to find out where your customers are and then, to the fullest extent possible, engage with them on a personal level. This engagement is what creates a personal connection and sustains brand loyalty. The February Hotel Business Review will explore these issues and examine how some hotels are successfully integrating social media into their operations.