Overpouring - or How to Send Liquor Profits Down the Drain

By Joanna Harralson Vice President Operations, The Insight Group International | October 28, 2008

Whenever a bar is generating healthy gross sales it is most likely racking up equally healthy profits, right? Not necessarily. Much to the dismay of owners and managers of bistros, bars, lounges, nightclubs and restaurants -anywhere drinks are prepared and served - profits are the result of good sales volume plus a multitude of factors which need to be created and nurtured on an ongoing basis.

If profitability is the goal, then control and constant diligence must be major components of the oversight provided by owners and managers if their establishments are to remain 'out of the red' and send profits spiraling upwards.

Liquor Cost Controls

Overpouring - a significant profit drain can be the lack of portion-control of liquor drinks. Whether bartenders employ this practice in the hope of eliciting larger tips, stroking a pal or regular customer, or simply haven't the necessary skills or tools to measure the proper amounts of liquor in drinks, the end result for a venue is money being subtracted from its coffers.

Freepouring alcohol directly from the bottle to the glass should always be considered a definite 'no-no.' The accuracy of such pours is highly questionable, even when performed by the most experienced, honest and highly skilled bartenders.

Using bottle portion-control devices can provide an effective line of defense against overpouring, as long as bartenders do not upend bottles a second time in a double-pouring effort to serve stronger drinks. Sadly, many bars don't utilize controlled systems featuring bottle-top dispensers or liquor guns for portion-control, at all, although there are several excellent systems on the market. Many such systems can even be interfaced with a point-of-sale system.

Coming up in January 2018...

Mobile Technology: Relentless Innovation

Technology has become a crucial component in attracting and retaining hotel guests, and the need to enhance a guest’s technology experience is driving a relentless pace of innovation. To meet and exceed guest expectations, 54% of hotels will spend more on technology in 2018, and mobile solutions in particular will top the list of capital investments. Many hotels are integrating mobile booking, mobile keys, mobile payments and mobile check-in into their operations. Other hotels are emphasizing the in-room experience, boosting bandwidth and upgrading flat screen TVs to more easily interface with guest mobile devices. And though not yet mainstream, there are many exciting technology developments on the near horizon. The Internet of Things (loT) is taking form in some places, and can be found in guest room control systems, voice activation systems, and in wearable sensors that can be used for access and payment options. Virtual reality headsets are available at some hotels so guests can enjoy virtual trips to exotic locations or if off-property, preview conference facilities and guest rooms. How long will it be before a hotel employs a fleet of robots for room service, or utilizes a hologram as a concierge, or installs gesture-controlled walls that feature interactive digital displays? Some hotels are already using augmented reality for translation services, or interactive wall maps, or even virtual décor. This pace of innovation is challenging property owners and brands to stay on top of the latest technology trends while still addressing current projects. The January Hotel Business Review will explore what some hotels are doing to maximize their opportunities in the mobile technology space.