Voluntary Actions, Not Mandatory Caps Needed for Climate Change Issue

By Steve Kiesner Director of National Accounts, Edison Electric Institute | October 28, 2008

Putting a mandatory cap on the country's CO2 emissions would lead to higher energy bills for you, and it would also most likely put a cap on the economy as a whole, which would slow down your guest traffic as well. While we need to address the climate change issue, McCain/Lieberman and other legislation that imposes mandatory caps on carbon are not the way to do it. There are a variety of other measures, including improving energy efficiency, that can help the country confront the climate issue today. I urge you to tell your senators not to endorse it or any other mandatory climate bills.

The McCain-Lieberman legislation originally came up in 2003. The Senate voted 'no' then. The U.S. House of Representatives has never considered a comparable version of this legislation. Economics are a major reason why.

According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), here's what could happen if the McCain/Lieberman bill was passed:

Every business, home, and community should be looking for ways to protect the environment. They should also look for ways to reduce the amount of CO2 they are producing. But these kinds of mandatory caps on CO2 are not the way to do it.

Long term, technological solutions on a global scale will be needed to reduce CO2 emissions. But in the short term, voluntary measures such as using energy more efficiently can have an immediate impact. Importantly, taking steps to improve energy efficiency can benefit the bottom-line as well.

For more advice and assistance in becoming more energy efficient, I encourage you to contact the electric utility or utilities that service your company. The electric utility can often be a great resource in helping you take control over your energy use. The power company will likely have historical data about when your hotel uses energy and how your energy use has grown over the years.

Coming up in March 2018...

Human Resources: Value Creation

Businesses must evolve to stay competitive and this is also true of employment positions within those organizations. In the hotel industry, for example, the role that HR professionals perform continues to broaden and expand. Today, they are generally responsible for five key areas - government compliance; payroll and benefits; employee acquisition and retention; training and development; and organizational structure and culture. In this enlarged capacity, HR professionals are no longer seen as part of an administrative cost center, but rather as a member of the leadership team that creates strategic value within their organization. HR professionals help to define company policies and plans; enact and enforce systems of accountability; and utilize definable metrics to measure and justify outcomes. Of course, there are always new issues for HR professionals to address. Though seemingly safe for the moment, will the Affordable Care Act ultimately be repealed and replaced and, if so, what will the ramifications be? There are issues pertaining to Millennials in the workforce and women in leadership roles, as well as determining the appropriate use of social media within the organization. There are new onboarding processes and e-learning training platforms to evaluate, in addition to keeping abreast of political issues like the minimum wage hike movement, or the re-evaluation of overtime rules. Finally, there are genuine immigration and deportation issues that affect HR professionals, especially if they are located in Dreamer Cities, or employ a workforce that could be adversely impacted by federal government policies. The March Hotel Business Review will take a look at some of the issues, strategies and techniques that HR professionals are employing to create and sustain value in their organization.