New Trends in Hospitality: Spa Rooms

By Dawn Walzak First Vice President, Tishman Hotel Corporation | October 28, 2008

In the blink of an eye fast forward to 2005 where a requirement of this ever-changing playing field is evolving your hotel to be able to catch the cresting wave of a trend and gain the favorable exposure that comes with these opportunities. The times are changing so quickly that even the most open-minded and adaptable hospitality executives are challenged to stay one step ahead of the competition. An example of this is the rapidly emerging entrance of spas into all markets of hotels. The next generation of spa services within the hotel industry is the new phenomenon of spa accommodations. Seen in high-end hotels in Asia and Europe over the last two years, spa-style accommodations are now gaining popularity in the United States. The Westin New York at Times Square is one of the first business hotels in the country to offer such accommodations with the hotel's new Spa Inspired Guestrooms.

To accommodate a growing demand for in-room treatments during peak spa hours, the two-year-old Westin at Times Square began to conceptualize the idea of creating rooms specifically designed for spa-goers. Evolving through its development, the idea took on a life of its own and in the true spirit of teamwork and entrepreneurialism, the 23rd floor of the Westin New York at Times Square was transformed into a spa retreat. The 13 Spa Inspired Guestrooms were created with input from everyone at the hotel. From the general manager to the spa manager and even hotel guests who stayed in "test" rooms and provided valuable feedback on everything from the amenities in the rooms to the price they would pay for the upgrade.

The goal of the Spa Inspired Guestroom is to create a tranquil, sensory ambience of wellness and comfort. This feeling is achieved from the moment the elevator doors open where guests are greeted by water features, bamboo and calming colors. Guests quickly realize that the 23rd floor offers something very different. Once inside the Spa Inspired Guestrooms an aromatherapy air diffusers fills the room with mood-enhancing scents and the bathroom is illuminated by a flickering candle.

Guests can relax in an electronic Shiatsu massage chair while listening to a soothing CD or reading one of the health and fitness magazines available. The mini-bar and in-room dining menu has also been enhanced with healthy alternatives. With in-room spa treatments available, travelers feel as though they have escaped to a sanctuary which creates a truly unique guest experience. As the February 25, 2005 issue of USA Today, which featured the Westin New York at Times Square Spa Inspired Guestrooms, said, "It's all about you: Spa Treatment is Everywhere - Pampering Gets Serious."

Westin Club King RoomWestin Club King RoomWhile the Spa Inspired Guestroom concept is still very new, it is answering the needs that today's travelers are requesting - a true experience. This is a request that the hospitality industry cannot ignore. Many hoteliers do not want to hear that it is not about just the guestroom as travelers feel that most brands are equal when it comes to accommodations. Travelers today are time starved and as marketers we must begin to cater specifically to the traveler that fits within your hotels demographics. If you are marketing to a Baby Boomer, the services, amenities and training standards should be different than if marketing to a high power female executive who travels constantly and has children at home. No longer does one size fit all.

A growing concern all hoteliers have is the increased operating expenses these additional items and concepts will create. The hospitality industry has become big business and there are many 'masters' to answer to including shareholders and owners therefore each of these emerging trends needs to be analyzed and reviewed to see if they should be implemented in your properties. While these concerns should not be ignored, perhaps there is a middle ground such as a trimmed down version of a branding initiative.

Hotel Newswire Headlines Feed  

Allison Ferguson
Ken Hutcheson
Eric Blanc
Zoe Connolly
Bob Carr
Bonnie Knutson
John Ely
Lynn McCullough
Lonnie Giamela
Charles B. Rosenberg
Coming up in February 2018...

Social Media: Engagement is Key

There are currently 2.3 billion active users of social media networks and savvy hotel operators have incorporated social media into their marketing mix. There are a few Goliath channels on which one must have a presence (Facebook & Twitter) but there are also several newer upstart channels (Instagram, Snapchat &WeChat, for example) that merit consideration. With its 1.86 billion users, Facebook is a dominant platform where operators can drive brand awareness, facilitate bookings, offer incentives and collect sought-after reviews. Twitter's 284 million users generate 500 million tweets per day, and operators can use its platform for lead generation, building loyalty, and guest interaction. Instagram was originally a small photo-sharing site but it has blown up into a massive photo and video channel. The site can be used to post photos of the hotel property, as well as creating Instagram Stories - personal videos that disappear from the channel after 24 hours. In this regard, Instagram and Snapchat are now in direct competition. WeChat is a Chinese company whose aim is to be the App for Everything - instant messaging, social media, shopping and payment services - all in a single platform. In addition to these channels, blogging continues to be a popular method to establish leadership, enhance reputations, and engage with customers in a direct and personal way. The key to effective use of all social media is to find out where your customers are and then, to the fullest extent possible, engage with them on a personal level. This engagement is what creates a personal connection and sustains brand loyalty. The February Hotel Business Review will explore these issues and examine how some hotels are successfully integrating social media into their operations.