Ten Common Interview Mistakes: How to Make the Big Day a Treat Instead of a Treatment

By Paul Feeney Managing Director, Sanford Rose Associates - Wayne | October 28, 2008

The job candidate hopes that he or she will find the perfect next place of employment - bright people working for a great organization that has its act together and operates with a powerful sense of purpose and high degree of urgency.

The employer, likewise, hopes to find that rare individual who walks on water and motivates others to follow.

Yet sometimes, for a variety of reasons, the parties fail to put their best foot forward, spend a frustrating day learning little about each other and part company uncertain about the outcome.

Much has been written about the interviewing mistakes that candidates make. Less has been written about the other half of the equation. But, as one byproduct of tens of thousands of candidate debriefings after their "blind dates" were over, Sanford Rose Associates has compiled a list of 10 common employer mistakes, along with some practical suggestions for avoiding them.

1. The interview got postponed - again and again and again.

Good recruiters sell urgency to candidates and promise decisiveness on the part of employers. That's because it is difficult to create excitement about tentative situations. In recent years, however, with productivity and multi-tasking the order of the day, corporate managers are overburdened and their schedules in a state of flux. While it's thoroughly understandable to them why their daily plans change from moment to moment, it creates doubts on the part of the candidate: just how important is the job and how urgent is the need to fill it? Therefore, try to schedule interviews for Mondays and Fridays, when people are most likely to be in town. Build redundancy into the interviewing team, so that one person's absence does not kill the day. If a truly vital member (for example, the CEO) bails, schedule a second interview but don't cancel the first. Demonstrate urgency and control.

Coming up in January 2018...

Mobile Technology: Relentless Innovation

Technology has become a crucial component in attracting and retaining hotel guests, and the need to enhance a guest’s technology experience is driving a relentless pace of innovation. To meet and exceed guest expectations, 54% of hotels will spend more on technology in 2018, and mobile solutions in particular will top the list of capital investments. Many hotels are integrating mobile booking, mobile keys, mobile payments and mobile check-in into their operations. Other hotels are emphasizing the in-room experience, boosting bandwidth and upgrading flat screen TVs to more easily interface with guest mobile devices. And though not yet mainstream, there are many exciting technology developments on the near horizon. The Internet of Things (loT) is taking form in some places, and can be found in guest room control systems, voice activation systems, and in wearable sensors that can be used for access and payment options. Virtual reality headsets are available at some hotels so guests can enjoy virtual trips to exotic locations or if off-property, preview conference facilities and guest rooms. How long will it be before a hotel employs a fleet of robots for room service, or utilizes a hologram as a concierge, or installs gesture-controlled walls that feature interactive digital displays? Some hotels are already using augmented reality for translation services, or interactive wall maps, or even virtual décor. This pace of innovation is challenging property owners and brands to stay on top of the latest technology trends while still addressing current projects. The January Hotel Business Review will explore what some hotels are doing to maximize their opportunities in the mobile technology space.