Spa Payroll and the Implosion Factor

By Jane Segerberg Founder & President, Segerberg Spa Consulting, LLC | October 28, 2008

During the current era of "infatuation with anything spa", it seems contradictory to mention the possibility of the implosion of spa businesses. After all, spas are still the "hot topic" and a highly desired and sought after travel and vacation experience. The reality is the Spa Industry has crossed the bridge from "build it and they will come" to consumer accountability, internal controls and business sustainability. Spas are more prolific now than five years ago. Spa consumers are increasing in numbers and spa consumer expectations are rising. With more spas and more savvy spa consumers, it is a time in the Spa Industry in which the cream will rise to the top and all others will fall by the wayside.

Your spa should provide increased business and visibility for your hotel/resort property as well as be a profitable department. High levels of service in the spa create a powerfully satisfying experience for each guest's visit. The spa experience is much more than just a service. It is a total hospitality experience. The experience not only includes the reserved treatment, but also the guest's entry and welcome to the spa, introduction to the facility, assistance during the pre treatment changing and relaxation activity along with the post treatment relaxation and closing experiences. The entire experience when orchestrated and managed to perfection is one delightfully smooth and consistent package. The challenge is in turning the expected high level of service into profit.

It is easy to understand that creating relaxing and memorable spa experiences for guests adds to the overall satisfaction of the guest's entire stay at your property. Spas can assist in illuminating a hotel/resort's excellent attributes. In addition to being a distinctive element of the property's overall image and positioning, it is also important that spas participate in contributing to overall resort profitability.

Choose your payroll control strategy wisely, or run the risk of creating a negative domino effect.

The very nature of the spa experience that makes it so successful - the high level of nurturing and one-on-one attention, is also the most costly element that can lead to the demise of its profitability. A quick glance at the spa's monthly statement clearly shows that spa payroll is the biggest expense line. Controlling total payroll wisely is necessary for spa sustainability and profitability. But, beware, choose your spa's profitability strategy wisely or run the risk of creating a negative domino effect that affects your spa's level of service and marketability and will eventually implode the business.

Profitability in the spa goes up dramatically when total salaries and wages drops below forty eight to fifty percent. Unfortunately, the spa experience is often seen solely as a treatment delivered by the service provider and not as a series of interconnected service touch points that delight and satisfy guest's needs. Payroll control that is focused on meeting the payroll demands of service providers while cutting back on leadership diminishes the orchestration and management of the full spa guest experience, causing its decline. Lack of strong leadership results in service that is inconsistent or non existent with guests feeling shortchanged. Without expert direction, the downward spiral of business sense continues as forecasting and scheduling staff converts to a lower priority resulting in less available service providers (I can't begin to list the number of times we have visited spas who were turning guests away, yet treatment rooms were empty). The very vision that enables a spa to be more progressive and create more business, including retail sales is diminished. The end result is reduced business, focus, leadership and service.

Hotel Newswire Headlines Feed  

Shannon Dooley
Janet Gerhard
Judy Hou
John Poimiroo
Jeff Guaracino
Teri Howe
Joyce Gioia
Katarina Puckett
Soy Williams
Marc Stephen Shuster
Coming up in March 2018...

Human Resources: Value Creation

Businesses must evolve to stay competitive and this is also true of employment positions within those organizations. In the hotel industry, for example, the role that HR professionals perform continues to broaden and expand. Today, they are generally responsible for five key areas - government compliance; payroll and benefits; employee acquisition and retention; training and development; and organizational structure and culture. In this enlarged capacity, HR professionals are no longer seen as part of an administrative cost center, but rather as a member of the leadership team that creates strategic value within their organization. HR professionals help to define company policies and plans; enact and enforce systems of accountability; and utilize definable metrics to measure and justify outcomes. Of course, there are always new issues for HR professionals to address. Though seemingly safe for the moment, will the Affordable Care Act ultimately be repealed and replaced and, if so, what will the ramifications be? There are issues pertaining to Millennials in the workforce and women in leadership roles, as well as determining the appropriate use of social media within the organization. There are new onboarding processes and e-learning training platforms to evaluate, in addition to keeping abreast of political issues like the minimum wage hike movement, or the re-evaluation of overtime rules. Finally, there are genuine immigration and deportation issues that affect HR professionals, especially if they are located in Dreamer Cities, or employ a workforce that could be adversely impacted by federal government policies. The March Hotel Business Review will take a look at some of the issues, strategies and techniques that HR professionals are employing to create and sustain value in their organization.