Worker Burnout: Five Solutions to Help Hotel Workers to Achieve Better Work/Life Balance

By Jason Ferrara Vice President, Corporate Marketing, CareerBuilder | November 27, 2009

In good economies and bad, hotel workers have a wide variety of issues they face, from advancement to workplace politics to performance reviews. As a hotel leader, staying on top of these issues is crucial to the success of your organization – your people make your business what it is.

One issue affecting your staff that has moved to the forefront in this difficult economy is worker burnout. The fallout of the recession has affected workers in all industries, companies of all shapes and sizes, in every state nationwide, and hotel workers are no exception. While some signs of economic stabilization have started to emerge, many hotel workers are still handling heavier workloads due to downsized staff levels – a stressful situation that can often result in burnout.

In fact, recent CareerBuilder research found that half of hospitality workers percent workers reported they have taken on more responsibility at work because of layoffs at their workplace. An additional47 percent said they are handling the work of two people. And 32 percent said they feel burned out.

With never ending task lists and heightened anxiety, workers are accommodating for those increased workloads by not taking the time to decompress outside of work. In fact, to make up for growing to-do lists, 41 percent of workers who kept their jobs after a layoff reported they are spending more time at work. An additional 14 percent are putting in at least 10 hours per day.

With burnout common in this current economy, it is essential for hotel leaders to address the problem. When burnout is handled properly and workers are at their full potential, both hotels and employees reap the rewards: hotels then have their staff working at full capacity to best serve their guests, ultimately impacting their bottom line, and workers are more likely to achieve their career goals and be productive. In addition, hotels that encourage work/life balance are more likely to attract future top talent who value that balance in their lives.

So, what can you do to help put out the fire?

Coming up in February 2018...

Social Media: Engagement is Key

There are currently 2.3 billion active users of social media networks and savvy hotel operators have incorporated social media into their marketing mix. There are a few Goliath channels on which one must have a presence (Facebook & Twitter) but there are also several newer upstart channels (Instagram, Snapchat &WeChat, for example) that merit consideration. With its 1.86 billion users, Facebook is a dominant platform where operators can drive brand awareness, facilitate bookings, offer incentives and collect sought-after reviews. Twitter's 284 million users generate 500 million tweets per day, and operators can use its platform for lead generation, building loyalty, and guest interaction. Instagram was originally a small photo-sharing site but it has blown up into a massive photo and video channel. The site can be used to post photos of the hotel property, as well as creating Instagram Stories - personal videos that disappear from the channel after 24 hours. In this regard, Instagram and Snapchat are now in direct competition. WeChat is a Chinese company whose aim is to be the App for Everything - instant messaging, social media, shopping and payment services - all in a single platform. In addition to these channels, blogging continues to be a popular method to establish leadership, enhance reputations, and engage with customers in a direct and personal way. The key to effective use of all social media is to find out where your customers are and then, to the fullest extent possible, engage with them on a personal level. This engagement is what creates a personal connection and sustains brand loyalty. The February Hotel Business Review will explore these issues and examine how some hotels are successfully integrating social media into their operations.