Average Room Rate – Is it a Myth?

By Venkat Rajagopal Professor, Pacific International Hotel Management School | July 03, 2011

Sales is the only means of earning profit in any business. Hotel managers are also not an exception to this phenomenon. In accommodation sector it is the sale of rooms that brings more revenue. When sale is the only means of earning profits as in other business, hotel managers also think that sale of room, good occupancy is the only means to improve the bottom line, since room sales compared to any other sales of the hotel provides better departmental income. Hence to earn more revenue by selling more rooms’ managers adopt ARR /ADR technique...

Hospitality or Accommodation sectors all over the world like any other business enterprises, attempts to think that a sale is the only means of producing profits. In the hotel sector room sales provides a greater contribution towards fixed expenses and overhead costs compared to the same amount of sale from any other revenue earning areas such as, food and beverage, telecommunications, laundry, shop rentals etc. In order to achieve this desired result of greater contribution there should be a sales mix.

The sales mix of any typical saleable room in a hotel mainly consists of four main elements such as:

  1. Hotel segments such as, free individual travellers (FIT’s), charters,
    groups, packages, honeymooners, transit pax, airlines crew, corporate
    travellers, MICE, again categorised as bed only, bed and breakfast, and
    various other plans.
  2. Variety of available rooms such as, single, double, standard, suites etc,
  3. Various bed configuration such as King, Queen, double, twin sharing, extra
    bed etc.
  4. Yield management whereby maximising revenues by lowering tariffs to increase
    sales during periods of low demand and by raising tariffs during periods of
    high demand.

Conventionally to determine an effective sales mix, room department revenue is calculated and then percentages of the total room revenue are calculated. A performance evaluation of rooms department is determined by average room sale revenue. Hence it is customary for every manager to look at the management report before the operation meeting commences and feel happy about the Average room rate (ARR) or Average daily rate (ADR). Some managers still think that ARR or ADR is the best tool to measure room department ratio. Similarly most commonly, sales and marketing department’s effort is also judged by either percentage of room occupancy or daily average room rate that has been achieved. The concept is simple. Let us imagine a hotel with 75 rooms, which sold 21, 500 rooms in a year and earned room revenue of $850,000.

The ARR or ADR is:

850,000/21,500 = $39.53.This exercise in reality is not 100% correct because of the four sales mix as mentioned above, plus a hotel earns room revenue not only from the bookings that has materialised, historically speaking hotels do charge no shows rates for non-guaranteed reservations, as well as for guarantied reservations. Hence the total revenue earned for the day or for the month or for the year is not only from actual number or rooms sold for various segments but also for different kinds of penalty for not showing up. Sometimes the revenue also includes a small commission earned from other hotels by bouncing the guests to other hotels when it is full and no rooms to sell. Average room rate or ADR could be of some meaning if we could express it as a ratio of maximum potential average rate, though by itself this ratio does not provide a complete and meaningful picture.

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Coming up in March 2018...

Human Resources: Value Creation

Businesses must evolve to stay competitive and this is also true of employment positions within those organizations. In the hotel industry, for example, the role that HR professionals perform continues to broaden and expand. Today, they are generally responsible for five key areas - government compliance; payroll and benefits; employee acquisition and retention; training and development; and organizational structure and culture. In this enlarged capacity, HR professionals are no longer seen as part of an administrative cost center, but rather as a member of the leadership team that creates strategic value within their organization. HR professionals help to define company policies and plans; enact and enforce systems of accountability; and utilize definable metrics to measure and justify outcomes. Of course, there are always new issues for HR professionals to address. Though seemingly safe for the moment, will the Affordable Care Act ultimately be repealed and replaced and, if so, what will the ramifications be? There are issues pertaining to Millennials in the workforce and women in leadership roles, as well as determining the appropriate use of social media within the organization. There are new onboarding processes and e-learning training platforms to evaluate, in addition to keeping abreast of political issues like the minimum wage hike movement, or the re-evaluation of overtime rules. Finally, there are genuine immigration and deportation issues that affect HR professionals, especially if they are located in Dreamer Cities, or employ a workforce that could be adversely impacted by federal government policies. The March Hotel Business Review will take a look at some of the issues, strategies and techniques that HR professionals are employing to create and sustain value in their organization.