A Reputation Management Primer for Hotels: Answers to Your Top 13 Questions

By Josiah MacKenzie Vice President , ReviewPro | November 07, 2010

In today’s ultra-networked world, you are only as good as your reputation. Your guests are telling your story, and no amount of PR or advertising can stop this.

It doesn’t matter how much you embrace social media: you cannot afford to ignore reputation management. Reputation management for hotels often focuses on reviews written by guests on sites such as TripAdvisor, but also involves monitoring other websites and networks.

In this article, we address some of your top questions on this topic, and include some thoughts from Brian Payea, trade relations manager at TripAdvisor.

1. Why should I be concerned about negative hotel reviews?

Consumers trust other consumers. Your potential future guests will be listening to what your past guests had to say. This is first created by the experience you’re providing, but it requires you to be listening to what these people are saying about that experience.

Knowing exactly what your guests are talking about helps you take appropriate action. Many times, negative reviews require action at an operations level, so it helps to have a system in place for sharing this information with the management team.

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Coming up in February 2018...

Social Media: Engagement is Key

There are currently 2.3 billion active users of social media networks and savvy hotel operators have incorporated social media into their marketing mix. There are a few Goliath channels on which one must have a presence (Facebook & Twitter) but there are also several newer upstart channels (Instagram, Snapchat &WeChat, for example) that merit consideration. With its 1.86 billion users, Facebook is a dominant platform where operators can drive brand awareness, facilitate bookings, offer incentives and collect sought-after reviews. Twitter's 284 million users generate 500 million tweets per day, and operators can use its platform for lead generation, building loyalty, and guest interaction. Instagram was originally a small photo-sharing site but it has blown up into a massive photo and video channel. The site can be used to post photos of the hotel property, as well as creating Instagram Stories - personal videos that disappear from the channel after 24 hours. In this regard, Instagram and Snapchat are now in direct competition. WeChat is a Chinese company whose aim is to be the App for Everything - instant messaging, social media, shopping and payment services - all in a single platform. In addition to these channels, blogging continues to be a popular method to establish leadership, enhance reputations, and engage with customers in a direct and personal way. The key to effective use of all social media is to find out where your customers are and then, to the fullest extent possible, engage with them on a personal level. This engagement is what creates a personal connection and sustains brand loyalty. The February Hotel Business Review will explore these issues and examine how some hotels are successfully integrating social media into their operations.