Landscaping Around High-Traffic Areas

By Ken Hutcheson President, U.S. Lawns | April 26, 2015

All hoteliers—no matter what size their properties are—have high-traffic areas.
From the moment a guest walks onto the property, to the moment he or she leaves, high-traffic areas can impact a guest’s experience. Since high-traffic areas are the most densely populated parts of the property, it’s important to have a well-designed landscaping plan to keep those areas property crisp, clean, and safe.

Hardscapes

Hardscapes, such as sidewalks, walkways, and footpaths, play an important role in the way high-traffic areas function. They help define the landscape’s border, direct people to their preferred routes, and help guests enjoy amenities on the property. Without the use of hardscapes, guests would be walking aimlessly around the property (which is a hotelier’s worst nightmare.) Just like with sidewalks located in cities or suburbs, hardscapes are a great resource to help hotels regulate foot-traffic.

Hardscapes are also great opportunities to promote your hotel’s brand message. For example, if your brand message is about creating a relaxing environment and a place to escape, like a Sandals or the Atlantis, subtle winding paths are a great way to lead guests to the pool and spa areas, as well as to the gardens and fountains areas. However, if your hotel is located in a major city, or is an efficiency hotel, those types of hardscapes aren’t needed.

Planting Around Hardscapes

The landscapes surrounding walkways and footpaths will be vulnerable to damage that results from foot traffic. The goal of your landscaping should be to keep guests off of grass and gardens. The best way to protect your grass is by planting landscape beds around walkways. Landscape beds work to add greenery and highlight a property’s features, while helping to regulate traffic and re-directing guests back onto sidewalks.

Hotel Newswire Headlines Feed  

Michael  Sullivan
John Welty
Steven Belmonte
Prentice  Howe
Al DeNapoli
Mike Paton
David Lund
Michael C.  Schmidt
Frank Meek
Bob  Kelleher
Coming up in February 2018...

Social Media: Engagement is Key

There are currently 2.3 billion active users of social media networks and savvy hotel operators have incorporated social media into their marketing mix. There are a few Goliath channels on which one must have a presence (Facebook & Twitter) but there are also several newer upstart channels (Instagram, Snapchat &WeChat, for example) that merit consideration. With its 1.86 billion users, Facebook is a dominant platform where operators can drive brand awareness, facilitate bookings, offer incentives and collect sought-after reviews. Twitter's 284 million users generate 500 million tweets per day, and operators can use its platform for lead generation, building loyalty, and guest interaction. Instagram was originally a small photo-sharing site but it has blown up into a massive photo and video channel. The site can be used to post photos of the hotel property, as well as creating Instagram Stories - personal videos that disappear from the channel after 24 hours. In this regard, Instagram and Snapchat are now in direct competition. WeChat is a Chinese company whose aim is to be the App for Everything - instant messaging, social media, shopping and payment services - all in a single platform. In addition to these channels, blogging continues to be a popular method to establish leadership, enhance reputations, and engage with customers in a direct and personal way. The key to effective use of all social media is to find out where your customers are and then, to the fullest extent possible, engage with them on a personal level. This engagement is what creates a personal connection and sustains brand loyalty. The February Hotel Business Review will explore these issues and examine how some hotels are successfully integrating social media into their operations.