The Golden Art of Hospitality

By Ashish Modak General Manager, LUX* Belle Mare | March 27, 2016

A few days ago while talking to an acquaintance, the conversation took us to discuss the roles and responsibilities of a hotel manager. The young man was very eager to understand the role of a General Manager of a hotel and the qualities required to be successful.

Years ago, I remember in one of my internship interviews for a leading hotel chain, the interviewer asked me a very simple question – ‘Do you think hospitality is an art or science?’ While I had answered what I thought sounded most appropriate on that occasion; the question has always remained with me. That I cleared the interview means I must have said something which resonated with the interviewer, it seems! What exactly is managing hotels like? For an onlooker it is a simple mathematical equation. Selling rooms and meals to achieve the bottom-line objectives of the business. While absolutely true, as all shall agree with me, it is not that simple.

Ensuring that maximum rooms are sold at the optimum price through the correct channels realising a desired mix of clientele willing to spend at least the budgeted spend at the hotel and getting the clients to really enjoy their stay and doing all of the above through a large team of individuals working with you - makes hotel management sound like a complicated mix of several algorithms. And indeed it is complicated. In today’s times, where customer has plenty of choices, where supply tends to exceed demand and where economic conditions are affecting general spend for the consumer – leisure travel business has become more complex than ever before. Add to it the reach of social media, which can propel your property to great heights or bring the hotel down in no time!

How do you work in such a scenario and ensure you come out on the top? I remember reading a very interesting quote from John Wooden, the basketball legend somewhere – ‘Don’t let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do?’

What am I exactly implying? Simply put, a hotel manager needs to focus first on things directly under his control and set them right rather than worrying about things outside his / her direct control. Let me elaborate. Amongst the very many things that a hotel manager does, lies a very easy sounding difficult task – The General Manager of a hotel ought to shape the culture of the place he manages. The Cambridge dictionary defines culture as ‘the way of life, especially the general customs and beliefs, of a particular group of people at a particular time’. And this, the general manager ought to do in a comparatively short span of time. Developing a particular style in the team is extremely important for this then displays the style the manager wants his hotel to portray. It is then only natural that the manager establishes a culture in his resort that he relates with and wants his hotel to reflect. How does he do it? By simply living it himself and displaying the values he stands for 24*7.

Every hotel has its own set of organisational values and guiding principles. These need to be followed but in addition to these, the manager needs to bring in his element of style to the place. I have seen a few different styles of management culture in different hotels over the years. One can walk in to a hotel, feel the vibes in the place, interact with the staff in various areas of the hotel, make his / her observations in a few hours and later upon meeting the manager – very often the assumptions of what kind of a person the manager might be come through very clearly. Of course every hotel manager is supposed to be hospitable, courteous and well versed in his role – this goes without saying! But it is the unspoken virtues, which come to the fore in a few minutes of interactions.

Hotel Newswire Headlines Feed  

Roberta Nedry
Frank  Vertolli
John Poimiroo
Rohit Verma
Juston Parker
Michael DiLeva
Simon Hudson
Carolyn Murphy
Tina Stehle
Kathleen Pohlid
Coming up in February 2018...

Social Media: Engagement is Key

There are currently 2.3 billion active users of social media networks and savvy hotel operators have incorporated social media into their marketing mix. There are a few Goliath channels on which one must have a presence (Facebook & Twitter) but there are also several newer upstart channels (Instagram, Snapchat &WeChat, for example) that merit consideration. With its 1.86 billion users, Facebook is a dominant platform where operators can drive brand awareness, facilitate bookings, offer incentives and collect sought-after reviews. Twitter's 284 million users generate 500 million tweets per day, and operators can use its platform for lead generation, building loyalty, and guest interaction. Instagram was originally a small photo-sharing site but it has blown up into a massive photo and video channel. The site can be used to post photos of the hotel property, as well as creating Instagram Stories - personal videos that disappear from the channel after 24 hours. In this regard, Instagram and Snapchat are now in direct competition. WeChat is a Chinese company whose aim is to be the App for Everything - instant messaging, social media, shopping and payment services - all in a single platform. In addition to these channels, blogging continues to be a popular method to establish leadership, enhance reputations, and engage with customers in a direct and personal way. The key to effective use of all social media is to find out where your customers are and then, to the fullest extent possible, engage with them on a personal level. This engagement is what creates a personal connection and sustains brand loyalty. The February Hotel Business Review will explore these issues and examine how some hotels are successfully integrating social media into their operations.