Project Delivery Systems Value the Partners of a Renovation Team

By Sam Cicero President, Cicero's Development Corp. | September 11, 2016

The Construction Management method involves having the overall planning and coordinating of the construction project fall to one single entity. In this method some of the risk is transferred from the owner to the construction manager. The downside of this method, however, is that sometimes there can be a conflict of interest as in many cases the contractor serves as the construction manager and project transparencies can be jeopardized as a result.
A single entity controls all aspects of project delivery in the Design Build method. This entity is responsible for the architect, engineer, interior designer, contracted services and holds all parties responsible through the duration of the project. This method can streamline the schedule as well as reduce overall costs. One of the downsides of this method is that the owner has little control over the design and/or construction process and there could be limited risk transfer.

Even with the different methods of project delivery, the old adage “it takes a village” still can and should apply in the construction renovation process. That old saying is not just conducive as it relates to how sometimes whole communities extend their support in raising the children of that community, but it can also apply when speaking of construction delivery systems and the importance of valued partners of a renovation project.

The successful completion of a renovation project can’t fall entirely on one entity, but instead on combined efforts from several entities working in tandem whose common goal is to ensure the project is completed on time, on budget and without compromising the owners’ design intent. And although the planning may in fact begin with the owner and the owner’s architectural representative, evidence has shown that involving all renovation partners early on is fundamental to ensuring a project is completed efficaciously.

Working in tandem with the owner, architect, designer and general contractor is not just efficient, but helps eliminate costs overruns as a result of unforeseen problems in the design, provides easy and timely access to materials and furnishings, and simply as put, allows for sharing thought-provoking methods of accomplishing the common goal of a successful project, which should be inherent in every team member.

In the typical Design-Bid-Build process, an owner engages an architect during the concept phase to help plan out the property’s improvement. The architect after visiting the property and communicating with the owner to understand the design intent, will provide drawings based not solely on the design intent, but will also need to consider some of the pre-renovation assessments of the buildings property. Once these drawings are developed, a selected interior designer is brought in to help further bring the picture into focus, so to speak.

The main role of the designer is to create an appealing, functional space based on the owner’s design intent and preliminary architectural drawings. The selected designer will take measurements, suggest furnishings, color pallets, fabrics and materials. After these selections have been incorporated into the architectural drawings, the architect usually develops bid documents and then invites general contractors to bid, thus acting as the owner’s representative at that point.

Coming up in January 2018...

Mobile Technology: Relentless Innovation

Technology has become a crucial component in attracting and retaining hotel guests, and the need to enhance a guest’s technology experience is driving a relentless pace of innovation. To meet and exceed guest expectations, 54% of hotels will spend more on technology in 2018, and mobile solutions in particular will top the list of capital investments. Many hotels are integrating mobile booking, mobile keys, mobile payments and mobile check-in into their operations. Other hotels are emphasizing the in-room experience, boosting bandwidth and upgrading flat screen TVs to more easily interface with guest mobile devices. And though not yet mainstream, there are many exciting technology developments on the near horizon. The Internet of Things (loT) is taking form in some places, and can be found in guest room control systems, voice activation systems, and in wearable sensors that can be used for access and payment options. Virtual reality headsets are available at some hotels so guests can enjoy virtual trips to exotic locations or if off-property, preview conference facilities and guest rooms. How long will it be before a hotel employs a fleet of robots for room service, or utilizes a hologram as a concierge, or installs gesture-controlled walls that feature interactive digital displays? Some hotels are already using augmented reality for translation services, or interactive wall maps, or even virtual décor. This pace of innovation is challenging property owners and brands to stay on top of the latest technology trends while still addressing current projects. The January Hotel Business Review will explore what some hotels are doing to maximize their opportunities in the mobile technology space.