Limited Service and High Design Changing Hotel Branding

By David Ashen Principal and Founder, dash design | November 26, 2017

When I walked into the new Hyatt Place in Legacy Village near Cleveland a few weeks ago, it was apparent a shift had taken place. This was no limited service brand designed for low-cost and convenience. Gone were the ho-hum finishes and swath of industrial materials. Instead, I was greeted by a sophisticated palette that complimented the interiorís modern furnishings, including a light fixture that I recognized as that of an admired British designer.

Noticeable improvements in limited service brandsí interiors and guest experiences arenít especially new, at least when it comes to select independent brands. But the advance of thoughtful design across an increasing line of conventional big brandsí limited service properties is. And itís a welcomed change.

Much of the high design now seen in limited service brands stems back to about a decade ago when two independents opened the way for design innovation in the properties; Alex Calderwoodís Ace Hotel and Andre Balazsí Standard Hotel. The brandsí fresh interiors combined with their of-the-moment vibe and attention to art belied each propertyís reasonable rates, treating guests with an unexpected experience that they embraced from the start.

When the Ace Hotel Portland opened in 2007 (one of my favorite places to stay), it featured inexpensive tiles and other materials used with a sense of style, along with a $60-to-$70 tab for an overnight room with a shared bathroom, $100 for room with a bathroom and $130 for suite. The combination of thoughtful design with low-cost rates was extraordinary. After all, guests of limited service brands like Choice Hotel, Marriott Courtyard and Residence Inn had come to expect low-cost rates at another kind of cost Ė uninspired accommodations with few amenities, save a kitchenette for complimentary breakfasts and, perhaps, a bar. But at Ace, even the option of sharing a room or bathroom, which, while not everyoneís ideal, tied into the burgeoning millennial generationís desire for accommodations that promoted sociability, including the presence of public areas outfitted for spontaneous mingling. By providing an environment that offered the community of youth hostels with the inspired design of an elevated property at an affordable price, Ace captured the loyalty of young adult travelers, especially with its later openings in New York and London.

What Balazs did with Standard Hotel and Calderwood with Ace Hotel was shift the focus of a brand from a commodity to a desire. They realized that guests donít want to forgo design and inspiration for price and their victories at providing both proved the sentiment. So much so, in fact, that low-cost now is viewed by many business and other travelers as an unsuitable exchange for interiors put together without much thought for their design. Itís no wonder that Ace Hotelís success at targeting and attracting the younger demographic through considered design, style and experience was picked up by big brandsí limited service properties, including those of Marriott, Hilton, Hyatt and Starwood, whose Aloft hotel was one of the first limited service properties by a big brand to step out of the traditional thought that low-cost accommodations negated the need for high design. At the time, the hotel, which had an urban vibe contained in a suburban box, had rethought its brand, looking more closely at the business travelerís needs. It found what Ace and Standard already knew Ė that travelers wanted something different than the ready availability of tired, cookie-cutter hotels. As a result, Aloft adopted a modern, more sophisticated design for its rooms and public spaces, not only elevating the brand to an aspirational level but also fully embracing an urban loft ethic. In essence, Aloft used less expensive materials in a more thoughtful way, demonstrating that low-cost design didnít have to feel cut-rate.

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