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Kevin Richards

By the year 2020, millenials will comprise over 50 percent of the U.S. population and they are poised to overtake previous generations in their zest for business travel. According to research conducted by the Global Business Travel Association (GBTA) millenials are nearly twice as likely to want to travel for business then baby boomers (45 percent to 26 percent, respectively). In addition, a strong majority of millennials, 57 percent, say technology can never replace face-to-face business meetings. So ready or not, here come the millennials, the next generation of road warriors, packing their smart devices and looking for b-leisure, Read on...

Jonathan Bailey

There are roughly 80 million millennials in the United States, and each year they spend approximately $600 billion. Clearly, marketers have recognized this group and are scrambling to reach out to them, connect in a relevant way and convince them of brand relevancy. Some are missing a big opportunity for success, however, because they are operating under the false assumption that all millennials belong in the same gigantic group. There is more than meets the untrained eye here, and properly targeting millennials is a multi-faceted, complicated effort. If you're like me, you are inundated with articles, webinars and conferences Read on...

Carolyn  Childs

Globally the influence of Millennials on travel and on marketing has been profound. In the US, Millennials are as large a generation cohort as Baby Boomers . In China, they are a smaller generation numerically thanks to the one child policy. But as the first generation to benefit from China's astonishing economic growth, 80s children (as they are known) are a wealthy and high-consuming group. The word Millennial has almost become synonymous with youth. But that is about to change. Read on...

DJ  Vallauri

A lot has been said and written about the "millennial traveler" and how "different" their travel and hotel needs are. How connected and ambitious they are, the young movers and the shakers in the modern business world. In fact, nearly every major hotel brand believes millennial travelers are seeking new places to stay when traveling, new experiences, new ways to connect, new ways to stay healthy while on the road and so on. New millennial brands continue to launch onto the scene. Brands like Marriott's Moxy, Hilton's TRU, Starwood's Aloft and Hyatt's Centric all seeking to be positioned to grab the growing share of millennial traveler. Read on...

Sarah Harkness

"Oh great," you must be thinking. "Another article about Millennials. Haven't we exhausted this topic already?" Trust me, as a Millennial I understand your frustration. Feeling like you are consistently labeled as lazy, entitled, distracted, and a contributor to the demise of the English language isn't good for one's self-esteem. I am not here to argue with whatever preconceptions that you may or may not have about my generation, instead I want to tell you what I do know, and why it is important for you as a travel brand to at least try and understand the collective "us". Read on...

Tema Frank

When it comes to success in the hospitality industry we tend – quite rightly -- to focus on staff and guests. But there are five other categories of people who can influence whether your hotel succeeds or fails. It is easy to forget about them, or even to see them as a threat to your profitability. But if you treat them right, there are many ways they can help you. Building strong relationships with them – even surprising ones like competitors – can end up helping both your organization and theirs. In this article we'll explore who these oft-overlooked allies are, why they are important to your business, and how you can win their support. Read on...

Bonnie Knutson

No matter how hot storytelling is in brand marketing and building, it is often misunderstood. One of the world's greatest brand storyteller, Guido Everaert, reminds us that good brand storytelling is not about the language, it is about creating and telling stories in a compelling way. It is about finding the right metaphors, and structure in which to tell your story. It's about hitting a hot button in the hearts and minds of the target markets. By doing so, you create a part of life and generate a story that is unique to your brand and, more importantly, can easily be readily remembered. In other words, the story has to be relevant to consumers and move them to act. In this article, you'll learn about the Storied Six of telling your hotel's brand story. Read on...

Lizz Chambers

Sales associates often operate on the periphery of hotel organizations with their sales methods and negotiation tactics shrouded in mystery from the rest of the team. Their efforts are nonetheless instrumental towards bringing in meetings and group business, and better communication is necessary with other on-property operations to ensure that guest service is never compromised. Ten strategies have thus been outlined to both heighten internal communications amongst different departments and increase sales performance. Read on...

Lorraine Abelow

Though the phenomenon of Americans retiring in Latin America began 25 years ago, it has accelerated in recent years. The 50 plus category is actively searching for safe and secure places in which to retire. Resorts located in the countries in this region can attract those searching for places to relocate by enticing them to use the comforts and resources of your hotel as a base, while they explore the region and its living options. By reaching out to this exploding market through a comprehensive marketing program including sales and public relations program initiatives, you can build customer loyalty. Read on...

Laurence Bernstein

Fundamentally, the difference between a "Good Brand" and a "Great Brand" is the ability of the organization, through its products, people and communications to engage on an emotional level. "Good Brands", and most successful brands are good brands, deliver promised services consistently and achieve high satisfaction ratings. "Great Brands" do exactly the same thing, but achieve off-the-charts satisfaction ratings because they have connected at a deeper level. On a more prosaic level, a visit to the marketing and revenue management teams "Good Brand Inc." is an immersion into complaints about OTAs and commodity pricing pressures (discounts); a visit to the same group at "Great Brand Inc." is an eye opening exposure to sustained margins, direct bookings, and eye-watering occupancy figures! Read on...

Bonnie Knutson

Just like people, brands need to be carefully nurtured and managed, and just like people, they get old and tired and need reinvigorating. In today's State of Brand world, every hotel owner/manager has to perform a regular health check on the hotel's brand. I don't mean just looking at occupancy levels, rack rates, or even food and beverage revenues. I mean fully understanding the health of your brand image, internally and externally. This means doing regular refresher sessions on the state of your brand for all key leaders to ensure that they are passionately connected and understand who they are and where you are going as a hotel. In this article, you'll see how the State of Brand has evolved over time and where it is going in the near future. Read on...

Pamela Barnhill

Does a brand have certain attributes? Do legacy brands include their new "soft" brands? Are so-called collection companies brands? With so many extensions and iterations, it's only natural to pose such questions. Is a brand a legacy brand or does it include the newly created soft brands? What about the collection companies, are those brands? Read on...

Tammy Farley

When it comes to rate shopping, most properties and management companies know they need it – and they need it now. This article outlines the advances that are being made to make rate shopping faster, friendlier and more flexible by illustrating the state of the art, citing case studies of successful users. Read on...

Robert Festinger

In the dictionary, rebranding is defined as the changing of a company or organization's corporate image. In reality, for businesses that are rebranding their hotels, the term exudes a much less simplistic picture. It can be a daunting task, even one that seems overwhelmingly complex and trying. But irrespective of how challenging the overhaul of a brand might first appear, it's not impossible if approached methodically and with an outlined strategy. In the end, it's a worthwhile undertaking for establishments looking to reinvent themselves in their respective markets. Which brings me to the first most pivotal point: understanding your market. Delving from that comprehension into the personality of your hotel will help prepare you, step by step, for a successful transition by creating an identity that resonates. So, how exactly is it done? Read on...

Laurence Bernstein

Soft Branding is the new "it thing" in hotel marketing. Much has been written about how it works for developers, owners and operators, but the more important question is whether and how they work for travelers. In this article we look at the fundamental structure two of the brands that are successful in the soft brands space, and view this in terms of consumer's functional and emotional needs. The answer, from a consumer point of view, might surprise you. Is soft branding the answer to everything? Read on...

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Coming up in January 2018...

Mobile Technology: Relentless Innovation

Technology has become a crucial component in attracting and retaining hotel guests, and the need to enhance a guest’s technology experience is driving a relentless pace of innovation. To meet and exceed guest expectations, 54% of hotels will spend more on technology in 2018, and mobile solutions in particular will top the list of capital investments. Many hotels are integrating mobile booking, mobile keys, mobile payments and mobile check-in into their operations. Other hotels are emphasizing the in-room experience, boosting bandwidth and upgrading flat screen TVs to more easily interface with guest mobile devices. And though not yet mainstream, there are many exciting technology developments on the near horizon. The Internet of Things (loT) is taking form in some places, and can be found in guest room control systems, voice activation systems, and in wearable sensors that can be used for access and payment options. Virtual reality headsets are available at some hotels so guests can enjoy virtual trips to exotic locations or if off-property, preview conference facilities and guest rooms. How long will it be before a hotel employs a fleet of robots for room service, or utilizes a hologram as a concierge, or installs gesture-controlled walls that feature interactive digital displays? Some hotels are already using augmented reality for translation services, or interactive wall maps, or even virtual décor. This pace of innovation is challenging property owners and brands to stay on top of the latest technology trends while still addressing current projects. The January Hotel Business Review will explore what some hotels are doing to maximize their opportunities in the mobile technology space.