It's Not Mobile First - It's Guest First

By Tim Peter Founder, Tim Peter & Associates | January 14, 2018

We're living through the next phase of upheaval in the industry. Mobile continues to transform the guest's experience much as the Internet has over the last 20-odd years. And yet I often hear from hoteliers who feel that these changes are at best a distraction, and, at worst, a complete waste of time.

Santayana's famous adage, “Those who cannot remember the past are doomed to repeat it” feels terribly appropriate. Because if you think mobile won't affect your business, here's a quote you might want to keep in mind:

“The reason why we invested in a company that does hotel operations… [is]it also optimizes the relationship with the guest. Then we can plug that into our own apps and provide a completely seamless consumer experience, from the search, to the booking, to the on-property experience, to the post-stay review."

Who said it? Cyril Ranque, president of Expedia Lodging Partner Services . He's talking about Expedia's investment in ALICE, a tool that allows guests to connect with your staff to address issues while on-property. But note again why they're doing this, to “provide a completely seamless consumer experience, from the search, to the booking, to the on-property experience, to the post stay review.”

I'm sorry, but isn't that our job as hotel executives?

Over the last 15 years, we've found new and innovative ways to let OTA's connect with our guests. And they're quite happily providing us the tools to do it all over again.

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Coming up in March 2018...

Human Resources: Value Creation

Businesses must evolve to stay competitive and this is also true of employment positions within those organizations. In the hotel industry, for example, the role that HR professionals perform continues to broaden and expand. Today, they are generally responsible for five key areas - government compliance; payroll and benefits; employee acquisition and retention; training and development; and organizational structure and culture. In this enlarged capacity, HR professionals are no longer seen as part of an administrative cost center, but rather as a member of the leadership team that creates strategic value within their organization. HR professionals help to define company policies and plans; enact and enforce systems of accountability; and utilize definable metrics to measure and justify outcomes. Of course, there are always new issues for HR professionals to address. Though seemingly safe for the moment, will the Affordable Care Act ultimately be repealed and replaced and, if so, what will the ramifications be? There are issues pertaining to Millennials in the workforce and women in leadership roles, as well as determining the appropriate use of social media within the organization. There are new onboarding processes and e-learning training platforms to evaluate, in addition to keeping abreast of political issues like the minimum wage hike movement, or the re-evaluation of overtime rules. Finally, there are genuine immigration and deportation issues that affect HR professionals, especially if they are located in Dreamer Cities, or employ a workforce that could be adversely impacted by federal government policies. The March Hotel Business Review will take a look at some of the issues, strategies and techniques that HR professionals are employing to create and sustain value in their organization.