Roxbury Group and Means Group Open Element Hotel in Restored Neo-Gothic Metropolitan Building Located in Detroit’s Entertainment District

USA, Detroit, Michigan. February 07, 2019

Element Hotels, part of Marriott International, along with Detroit-based Roxbury Group and Means Group, announce today the opening of Element Detroit at the Metropolitan, marking the debut of the stylish and eco-focused hotel brand in Michigan. The hotel, which has been incorporated into a renovated 92-year-old neo-Gothic building in the heart of Detroit's entertainment district, aims to fuel a balanced life for travelers on the road. Designed for today's healthy, active traveler, Element Hotels has redefined the longer stay experience with a nature-inspired design philosophy that is clean, modern and bright.

“We are thrilled to be bringing Element Hotels to Michigan for the first time with the opening of this property that is steeped in so much history,” said Toni Stoeckl, Vice President, Distinctive Select Service Brands, Marriott International. “The Metropolitan has sat vacant for nearly 40 years and was destined for demolition, making the opening particularly special for us - we're so excited to have played a role in bringing this iconic building back to life for the city of Detroit.”

The Metropolitan Building, was originally opened in 1925 and previously was a destination for jewelers and shoppers alike. The Element Detroit at the Metropolitan boasts 110 studio and one-bedroom guest rooms. The hotel will also be home to a rooftop bar and patio, The Monarch Club at The Metropolitan, with private event space and unparalleled views of downtown Detroit and Comerica Park, the home of the Detroit Tigers. The Monarch Club will be the first of three food and beverage venues to open in the building, and is slated to debut in the first quarter of this year. The property is being managed by Azul Hospitality of San Diego, Calif.

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