Hotel Equities Promotes Bryan DeCort to Executive Vice President

USA, Atlanta, Georgia. June 06, 2019

Atlanta-based hotel owner, operator and development firm, Hotel Equities (HE), named Bryan DeCort to the position of executive vice president. He reports directly to Brad Rahinsky, HE's president & CEO.

Bryan has over 25 years of experience in hospitality and operations. Since joining Hotel Equities in 2017, he has helped restructure the organization's operational platform to aid in HE's growing portfolio of hotels. He worked closely with Hotel Equities' executive team to ensure a consistent approach to implementation and developed a long-term strategy to promote performance-based growth. His efforts have resulted in the strengthening of technical capabilities across all departments, as well as consistent high-performance results among their portfolio of hotels.

"Bryan is a key member of our senior leadership team and has been instrumental in expanding and strengthening our operational footprint," said Brad Rahinsky. "His passion, charismatic servant leadership and operational expertise make him a perfect fit for the new position. I look forward to working alongside him as we continue to focus on operational excellence across our portfolio of hotels."

Prior to joining HE, Bryan served in a series of executive level positions at luxury hotels with Marriott International, Renaissance, Sheraton and Omni Hotels. He also spent a portion of his career in multi-unit leadership roles with two highly-respected national parking companies.

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Coming up in December 2019...

Hotel Law: A Labor Crisis and Cyber Security

According to a recent study, the hospitality industry accounted for 2.9 trillion dollars in sales and in the U.S. alone, was responsible for 1 in 9 jobs. In an industry of that scope and dimension, legal issues touch every aspect of a hotel's operation, and legal services are required in order to conform to all prevailing laws and regulations. Though not all hotels face the same issues, there are some industry-wide subjects that are of concern more broadly. One of those matters is the issue of immigration and how it affects the ability of hotels to recruit qualified employees. The hotel industry is currently facing a labor crisis; the U.S. Labor Department estimates that there are 600,000 unfilled jobs in the industry. Part of the problem contributing to this labor shortage is the lack of H2B visas for low-skilled workers, combined with the difficulty in obtaining J-1 visas for temporary workers. Because comprehensive immigration reform is not being addressed politically, hotel managers expect things are going to get worse before they get better. Corporate cyber security is another major legal issue the industry must address. Hotels are under enormous pressure in this area given the large volume of customer financial transactions they handle daily. Recently, a federal court ruled that the Federal Trade Commission had the power to regulate corporate cyber security, so it is incumbent on hotels to establish data security programs in order to prevent data breaches. The lack of such programs could cause hotels to face legal threats from government agencies, class action lawsuits, and damage to their brand image if a data breach should occur. These are just two of the critical issues that the December issue of Hotel Business Review will examine in the area of hotel law.